New for 2015

1813/15 Charlotte County, Virginia Chancery Case

Names Benjamin Tatum (~1730 to 1812/13) Descendants!

Much more Children of Stephen Tatom (ca1721 to 1789)

A Reconstruction of Early Tatoms from Colonial Virginia

 

New for 2016

John Tatum (~1758 to 3 August 1824 Dickson County, Tennessee)

And details on his Children

Three Sons of Barnett Tatum (1740/44 to >1821+)

Details -  Children of John Tatum “II” (~1760 to 1833 Lincoln Co., Ga.)

 

Researcher - James R. Murphy, previous 1 December 2015; revised 5 February 2016.  Warning – There are many missing details and major issues which still need resolving.  The Tatoms earliest years in America are a mess, mostly from the lack of findings.   Time is now to put together what is known.  Thanks go to Gary Tharp for his help and sharing his information.   This chapter has two parts.

 

Summary of Part One: Abel Tatom - Possible Immigrant

 

Abel Tatom (7 February 1642 - English Baptism date – candidate for possible immigrant) – 1st Generation Immigrant.  Virginia Counties: In 1667 York; in New Kent before 1683; in (Old) Rappahannock/Essex after 1683.  Only one son known – John Tatom, but are their more?  Is the 2nd generation John Tatom the correct ancestor progenitor?

 

John Tatom (ca1680/90 to __), son of Abel Tatom – candidate for possible 2nd Generation.  Virginia Counties - King William in 1722, Spotsylvania in 1726.   Almost nothing is known about him and little to connect him with later Tatoms except for the spelling and location.   Some Tatom descendants believe this is the wrong John Tatom and their Tatoms came from Norfolk County, Virginia.  They do site evidence, reported in this chapter.  Also, there is a developing line of Tatum/Tatoms in nearby early Northampton County, Virginia.  Whoever the correct progenitor, the following Tatoms are brother and sisters as noted by (I) to (VII) in the 1774 Susanna Tatom Fullilove will:

 

Summary of Part Two: Seven Children of ??? Tatom* (born ca1680/90)

* First name likely to be “John”  

Children are (I) to (VII) and grandchildren (1), (2), etc.

 

(I). John Tatom “I” (ca1715/20 to 1794) + Sarah.  Granville Co, NC and Wilkes County, Ga. Children (1) to (9): (birth date estimates need much better accuracy)

(1). Absalom Tatom (1742 to 1802 per gravestone, Wake Co. NC).  Bachelor.  Sometimes written as “Abraham Tatom/Tatum” in records.  Key will.

(2). Barnett Tatom + Mary Thompson

(3). Abel Tatom (_ to 1798 Ga) + Milly Harris

(4). John Tatom Jr or “II” (died 3 November 1830) + Rebecca Stovall + Martha Hicks

(5). William Tatom + Polly __   

(6). Henrietta Tatom (died ~1793 Ga) + John Fullilove

(7). Elizabeth Ann Tatom + William Hicks

(8). Abner Tatom (1755 to 1819 Madison County, Al) + Mary Currin

(9). Keziah Tatom + Jesse Newby + Samuel Goodwin.

(II). Stephen Tatom (ca1721 to 1789 Orange County, NC) + Mourning __.  Spotsylvania, Virginia and Orange County, North Carolina. Children (1) to (10):

(1). Stephen Tatom + Sally Owen

(2). John Tatom (1758-1824)

(3). Sarah Tatom; (4). Anna Tatom,

(5). William Tatom (1760-1847)

(6). Elizabeth Tatom; (7). Francis Tatom (m); (8). Rizia (Kezia?) Tatom

(9). Mary Tatom; (10). Jemima Tatom

(III). Nanny Tatem Graves

(I). John Graves

(2). Stephen Graves

(IV). Jemima Tatom Carrington

(V). Sarah Tatom Chandler

(VI). Benjamin Tatom (~1730 to 1813) + Mary Gravit or Gravitt:  Lunenburg Co., Va.  Children (1) to (13):

(1). Reubin Tatum (~1752) + Ann Crafton

(2). Joseph Tatum (~1755) + __

(3). William Tatum (~1759) + Mary

(4). Benjamin G. Tatum + Polly

(5). John Tatum + __

(6). Mary Tatum + Daniel Lefoe

(7). Susanna Tatum + John Haley

(8). Orinia Tatum + William O. Fullilove

(9). Lucy Tatum

(10). Charity Tatum + James Robertson

(11). Wealthy Tatum + Thomas Stokes

(12). Sarah Tatum + Elam Lewis

(13). Gravit or Gravitt Tatum + Mary

(VII). Susanna Tatom Fullilove; Has key 1774 Will naming brothers and sisters.  Husband is never named.  Husband may be Thomas Fullilove, but haven’t seen the evidence.

(Use of “ca1720” is a speculative date estimate with little evidence for its basis.   Use of “~1720” is a better estimate.)    

 

Summary of Part Three - Miscellaneous Information: (1) Tatom/Tatums who can’t be placed - (a) John Tatum (died 1725 Northampton County, Virginia + Will), (2) Thomas Tatum (died 1769 Currituck County, North Carolina, (3) Samuel Tatom (died 1772 York County, Virginia + will), (4) Richard Tatom (1730 – 1790 Bladen County, North Carolina.

   

Part One – One Possible Immigrant – Abel Tatom

 

Abel Tatom – Possible Progenitor Candidate – 1st Generation Immigrant

 

Abel Tatom: Baptized 7 February 1642 at All Saints Church, Leicester, Leicestershire County, England, parents being “George and Grace Tatom.”**   Possible progenitor and immigrant to Virginia.  Abel is a very obscure individual.  Originally noted by David Wilson.*

Earliest known record in America: 1667

Married: Name of wife has not been identified.

Children: Only John Tatom (born ca1680/1690) known so far

Died between 1691 and 1722.

Parents: George and Grace Tatom of Leicestershire County, England. **   Warning – Possible descendants did not use the names of George or Grace, but their children’s names are compatible.

Brothers/Sisters (not children) - all Baptized at All Saints Church, Leicester: (1). Grace Tatam (2 July 1627), (2). Francis Tatom (female – 13 May 1631), (3). Anne Tatom (19 January 1633), (4). John Tatom (26 March 1637), (5). William Tatom (21 May 1641).  Did John Tatom (1637) come to America?

Virginia Counties identified for Abel Tatom: (1). 1667 - York; (2). +/- 1683 New Kent (probable home site); (3). 1683 to 1722 - (old) Rappahannock which became Essex County in 1692; (4). Possibly King William County.        

* David Wilson, 27 March 2006 posted on GenForum.com under Tatum/Tatom Surname.

** England, Select Births and Christenings 1538-1975 on ancestry.com

 

Research frustrations: There are so few findings, that one might reasonably question whether the correct locations have been found.

 

King William, New Kent, King and Queen Counties lost their county records, with partial losses in surrounding counties.   Abel and/or John Tatom do not appear on the important 1704 Virginia property owner’s tax to the King called the “Quit Rents of Virginia 1704.”   Quit Rents included all Virginia Counties including “burned” counties, except counties north of the Rappahannock River which went to the Lord Fairfax families; i.e. Richmond County.   A 1715 Essex County Quit Rent still exists and again, there is no Tatom family by any spelling.    Renters were not part of these lists.

    

New Kent County, Virginia is one of these badly burned counties for records.  The Registry and Vestry for Saint Peter’s Parish of New Kent County still exists.  No Tatoms are named in the 1680-1787 Parish Registry!

 

The Fulliloves were a family closely allied with them.  In the 1704 Virginia Quit Rents, Thomas Fullalove owned 100 acres in King William County, Virginia.   King William lost all of its county records from a courthouse fire in 1785.   There were several church parishes in early King William County, the earliest being St. John’s, founded in 1680.   This St. John’s Church still exists but not their Parish records.   Anything new on the earliest Tatoms is likely to come from surrounding counties, religious lists, provincial records, or obscure records filed in England. 

 

Details for Abel Tatom

 

1667 January 24 - York County, Virginia:  Abell Tatum is listed as a witness in a defamation suit.

(Record Book 4/163-164 per David Wilson)

 

1683 August 4 - (old) Rappahannock County, Virginia:  Stephen Bembridge, Planter of Rappahannock County deeded to Abell Tatom, planter of New Kent County 150 acres on the Calf Pasture Branch, adjoining Michall Raughtery and Mr. William Clayborne.   Signed: Stephen “x” Bembridge.  Witnesses: James Harrison and John “X” Hewitt.  Recorded 28 August 1684?.  (Rappahannock County Deed Book 7, page 120/121.)

 

1691 October 2 - (old) Rappahannock County: Daniel Phates, Planter, of Rappahannock County deeded to Samuel Coats of same county, 300 acres formerly taken up by Stephen Benbridge, lying and being in the Parish of South Farnham in Rappahannock County, bounded as followeth, land that was formerly old Thomas William and adjoining Abell Tathum’s land, to James Newballs land.  Signed: Danll. Phatres.  Witnesses: John Collivowe, Leon Williamson.  Entered 7 October 1691.   (DB 8/263)

 

            Notice the terminology in “Abell Tathum’s land.”   This suggests Abel was not living there in October 1691.  One might speculate he was still in New Kent County.

 

             (Old) Rappahannock County was established 1652 from Lancaster County and abolished in 1692.   Its records ended when it was cut up into two counties: Essex County (founded 1692) and Richmond County (founded 1692).    This is not the same as today’s Rappahannock County, Virginia.  1722 September – Essex  County, Virginia:  John Tatom of St. John Parish, King William County deeded to Thomas Coleman for 10 pounds, 160 acres land of Abel Tatom, father of John.  Abel Tatom had bought this land of Stephen Benbridge.  (Essex County Deed Book 1721 #4, page 102)

 

            Harris adds this deed also mentions “bordered on the Bestline of Col. William Clayborne.”*    “Bestline” should be “west line.” 

 

The following might be a clue to the location.    On 16 April 1683, Stephen Bembridge and Thomas St. John were granted 110 acres joining the land of Col. William Clayborne - deceased, to the swamp of Peanketank.  This stream is now spelled Piankatank Swamp and is a stream, also called Dragon Swamp.    Calf Pasture could be a branch of or at least near the Piankatank such as the Rappahannock River to its immediate north.   The Piankatank divides several counties with Middlesex and Essex on the north side and Gloucester, King & Queen, and King William on the south side.   Augusta County, Virginia also has a Calf Pasture Creek, but during these years, this area was Indian lands and was not settled until 1740.  Easternmost counties of Lancaster and Middlesex were established before 1683 and should not be within Tatum’s deed.             * Old New Kent County, Virginia by Malcolm Hart Harris, page 517.

 

John Tatom, son of Abel Tatom – Possible Progenitor – 2nd Generation

 

John Tatom, born ca1680/90 and died __.  Really nothing exists to estimate a birth date, so ca1680/1700 must be suspect.  Reported born King William County, Virginia is speculation.   

Virginia Counties: 1st – 1722 King William, 2nd - 1723/24 Richmond, 3rd - 1726 Spotsylvania

Married __ and wife’s name __.

Parents are Abel Tatom + unknown wife.

Spelling of surname: Spelling differences may not work here, as scribes were often uncaring about correct surname spelling and literacy levels were low. Names were phonetically spelled.

Points of Tatom/Tatum Confusion in Virginia:

(1). (probably not – too late) 1724 Richmond County’s John Taynton whose mother was Mary Gallopher/Gallagher.  Taynton was a servant bound first at age 3 to John Chaproe and a 1724 court granted his freedom for lack of a promised education. *   Might be a Tatton.

(2) (not understood) John Tatum ** died 1725 Northampton County, Virginia and left a will.   More details can be found at the end of this chapter.  Further searching for his son John Tatum may or may not be useful.  

*Richmond County, Virginia Order Book 1722-1724, by Ruth and Sam Sparacio, 1998, pg. 54, 57. 

** Northampton County, Virginia Record Book – Court Cases, Volume 15, 1710-1717, by Howard Mackey and Marlene A. Groves, 2003, pg. 206

 

Details for John Tatom, son of Abel Tatom – 2nd Generation

 

1722 September – Essex  County, Virginia:  John Tatom of St. John Parish, King William County deeded to Thomas Coleman for 10 pounds, 160 acres land of Abel Tatom, father of John.  Abel Tatom had bought this land of Stephen Benbridge.  (Essex County Deed Book 1721 #4, page 102)

 

1726 June 6 - Spotsylvania County Land Patent:   John Tatham patented 1000 acres in the Fork of the Rappa(hannox) River, beginning by the “riverside thence we by the muddy run side….”

 

1727+: This is where his trail disappears.  There is nothing linking this John Tatom to the Tatoms who follow, except for the spelling of Tatom and his general location in Virginia.  

 

Part Two – ??? Tatom (born ca1680/90) and his Children

 

The following will gives us our best clues to early Tatoms:

 

1774 May 2 - Granville County, North Carolina (abstracted copy):  Will of Susannah Tatom Fullilove of Granville County, North Carolina. 

To my Cousin Winny Frit Adams, my Negro girl Janney….

To my son-in-law John Fullilove… and to his daughter Susannah Fullilove

To my brother Stephen Tatom 10 pounds….  

To my sister Hanney Graves. 

To my daughter-in-law Elizabeth Blackwell… 

To my sister Jemima Carrington….

To my cousin Agnes Hicks…

To my cousin Susanah Gravets….  

To my sister Sarah Chandler…. 

To my bother Benjamin Tatom 5 pounds…and if he has Eiry named one of his daughters (named) Susannah, same amount…

To cousin Henrietta Fullilove and Winneyfret Addams…  

To Kezia Goodwin…  

To John Tatom’s wife… 

To Elizabeth Ann Tatom…  

To Salley Fullilove and Nancy Fullilove… 

To my brother John Tatom, I give 8 pounds…

To my sister Nanney Graves and to her two sons John Graves and Stephan Graves…

To Jemima Carrington.   

To my son in law John Fullilove and to his two sons, Tho. Fullilove and Ludwell Fullilove…

What remains to my son in law John Fullilove and his two sons Thomas Fullillove and Ludwell Fullilove.  

Appoint my brother John Tatom, Executor.  Witnesses Barnet Tatom, Abel Tatom.  Signed: Susanah Fullilove.  Entered August Court 1774.  (Volume 1, page 52)

From Carolyn Whitaker found on rootsweb.ancestry.com, 18/5/2011; her source Bill Tatom from his website.

 

1774 November – Granville County Court: Account of sales of estate of Susanna Fullilove by her Executor John Tatom, November Court 1774 – items sold to John Fullilove, Peter Bennett, John Blalock, Burgess White, Jesse Newby, George Harris, William Blalock, Richard Harris, John Tatom, Samuel Adams, Abel Tatom, John Harris, Morning Hunt, Christopher Hunt, Bernard Tatom, John Maulden, Samuel Goodman, Benjamin Ragland, Edward Bullock.

Abstracts of Wills and Estate Records of Granville County, North Carolina 1746-1805 by Zae Hargett Gwynn, 1973, page 46.

 

Seven Children of ??? Tatom, (born ca1680/1690)

Based on Susannah Tatom Fullilove’s will

Children will be listed as (I) to (vii) and grandchildren (1), (2), (3).

 

(I).  John Tatom “I” (ca1715/20 to 1794) + Sarah __, son of ??? Tatom (born ca1680/90 and died __.)   

John Tatom “I”

Will be identified here as John Tatom “I,” which may not be correct.  Original records never used “I” or “II.”

Born: ca1715/20, little to estimate his birth date.  However, his son Absalom Tatom was born 1742 per gravestone. 

Married Sarah __ who noted in John’s will.   Any previous wives are speculative.

Died before 8 October 1794 in Wilkes County, Georgia.  See his will.

Parents: No proof that his father was named John Tatom

 

Details for John Tatum “I”

 

John Tatum “I”, son of __, was born ca1715/20 and died 1794.  He married Sarah. 

 

1769 North Carolina – Granville County tax: John Tatom; 4 whites, 2 blacks.

1771 North Carolina – Granville County tax: John Tatom

1778 February 3 – Granville County:  Joseph McDaniel and wife Sarah, deeded land to John Tatom. (DB L/255)

Kinfolks of Granville County, North Carolina 1765-1826 by Zae Hargett Gwynn 1974, page. 37.

1784 North Carolina – Granville County tax: John Tatom; also a John Tatom, Jr.

1785 Georgia, Wilkes County Tax: John Tatum 200 acres, 1 poll.  Deed: Thomas Owens deeded to John Tatom, planters, 200 acres on Pistol Creek, 17 March 1785.  Witnesses: Z. Lamar, Abner Tatom.  

Early Records of Georgia: Wilkes County, Genealogical Publishing, 1932, page 252

1785 March 17 – Wilkes County, Georgia: Thomas Owens deeded to John Tatom, planters, 200 acres on Pistol Creek.  March 17, 1785.  Z. Lamar, Abner Tatom, Test.

Early records of Georgia: Wilkes County, by Grace Gilliam Davidson, 1991.

1793 March 21 – Wilkes County, Georgia:   Will of John Tatom, Sr.   Wife Sarah to use all estate for her subsistence during life.  Son William to have a cow, etc., in proportion with other children.  The estate to be divided into 9 equal parts, one to the children of my dec’d daughter Henrietta Fullilove, one to the children of my daughter Elizabeth Ann Hicks, one to the children of deceased daughter Keziah, five pounds of said share to Samuel Goodwin, her eldest son.  The remainder in three parts, one to the other son, and the other third to her daughters (not named).  The other six parts to be divided equally among the rest of my children, not named, my son in this state to give notice to those in N.C., before a division.  Sons Abel, Abner, John, and William to be Excrs.  Signed March 21, 1793.  Probated Oct. 8, 1794.  Thomas Owens, James Hester, Thomas Shannon, Test.    (Volume 1, page 121)

1797 November 18 – Wilkes County, Georgia:  Tatom, John, dec’d.  Abel and Abner Tatom, excrs.  Receipt of Robert Crocket for part of the legacy of Barnett Tatum of York County, South Carolina 18 November 1797, signed in Lincoln County, Georgia.  Receipts 1800 from Barnard Tatom and John N. Newby for part of legacies.  Returns March 1802, paid Benjamin Taylor in part of the legacy of his wife Susannah Fullilove and John Taylor in part of the legacy of his wife Temperance Fullilove.

Early records of Georgia: Wilkes County, by Grace Gilliam Davidson, 1991.

 

Children of John Tatom “I” (ca 1715 – 1794)

Children are (1), (2), (3), etc.

           

(1). Major Absalom Tatom (born 1742 and died 20 December 1802 in Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina, and buried City Cemetery), son of John Tatom “I” (ca1715 to 1794).   Some records spell him as Abraham Tatom, which may derive from being called “Abe.”  Birth and death dates are from his grave stone.  No wife or children are mentioned in his will.  Absalom Tatom was a land speculator in many counties as far away as Tennessee.  He ranged widely and was likely influential to guiding relatives to new locations. 

 

            “Absalom Tatom (1742 to 20 December 1802), military leader, delegate to the Constitutional Convention of 1788, and a member of Congress, was born in Granville County.  He first appears in NC records as a sergeant in the local militia in 1763.  On 1 September 1775, in anticipation of the Revolutionary War, he was commissioned first lieutenant in the First North Carolina Continental Regiment; he was promoted to Captain on 19 June 1776.  The reason of his resignation in the fall, on 19 September, is unknown, but on 15 August 1778 he enlisted in state service as assistant quartermaster and keeper of the arsenal at Hillsborough.  Before the end of the year he also became contractor for the town.  He resigned both positions when commissioned Major of the detachment of North Carolina Light Horse on 12 February 1779, but in July he was named clear of the Randolph County Court and later in the year was elected to represent that county in the House of Commons.   …In 1782, the Continental Congress named him one of three commissioners to survey lands to be granted to Continental soldiers in the western territory that later became Tennessee.  …In 1782, Tatom served as private secretary to Governor Thomas Burke and as the state tobacco agent.  …In May 1785 he was elected surveyor of North Carolina by the Continental Congress and soon afterwards was named by the state as a commissioner to sign paper money.  In 1788, he was a delegate to the Constitutional Convention as well as the Hillsborough borough representative in the legislature.  He served in the next six sessions as well but died shortly before the end of the last one.  …Available records make no mention of Tatom’s family, marital status, or religious affiliation…..”

From “Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, Volume 6, page 5, 1996 edited by William S. Powell

 

Details for Absalom Tatom

 

1763 March 24 – North Carolina: “We the undersigned Subscribers do hereby Acknowledge to have received of Robert Harris, Colonel of the Granville Regiment of Militia, the Sums opposite our respective names in full for Our Services, in protecting the publick peasce at Hillsborough in Sept. last.  Dated 24 March 1763:  (Names include) Abraham Tatum, Sergt. 2 pounds, 8 shillings, for 12 days.  Received by includes: “Abra. Tatom.”  Granville County: the within Receipt was proved by the Oath of Colo. Robt. Harris…and Sworn before me.  Sherwood Harris, J.P. 7 October 1769.

North Carolina Militia Returns 1754-1755, 1758 and 1767 by Mountain Press, 2008, pg 89

 

1775 and 1776 - North Carolina:  Register of Continental Troops Mustered into the Service of the United States, 1775 and 1776:

First Battalion: Lieutenants: (include) Abraham Tatum

History of North Carolina: From the Earliest Discoveries to the Present Time by John W. Moore, volume II, page 443.

 

1778 – North Carolina:  Laws of North Carolina – 1778; VI. And be it further enacted by the Authority aforesaid, that … running the dividing Line between…Counties of Guilford and Randolph….   And Abraham Tatom, William Cole, John Hinds, John Collier and William Bell, commissioners for fixing upon the most convenient place for erect the Court House, Prison and Stocks for the County of Randolph….   And they are hereby empowered and required to run the said dividing Line between the said County of Guilford and the County of Randolph….

The State Records of North Carolina, Volume 24 Laws 1777-1788, Collected and Edited by Walter Clark, 1906, page 235.

 

1780 May – Middle Tennessee: “Absalom Tatom, signer of the Cumberland Compact, May 1780.  His slave was taken prisoner by the Indians during their attack at Clover Bottom in 1780.”    

1770-1790 Census of the Cumberland Settlements – Davidson, Sumner and Tennessee Counties (In What is Now Tennessee), compiled by Richard Carlton Fulcher 1990/2002, pg 119.

 

            Clover Bottom is within the east side of today’s Nashville, Tennessee.

 

1781 + 1782 Randolph County, North Carolina:  Members of the North Carolina General Assembly from Randolph County, House of Commons:  1781 – J. Harper and Absalom Tatom; 1782 – Edward Williams, A. Tatom.

Historical Sketches of North Carolina, by Lippincott, Grambo, 1851, pg. 349.  

 

1782 – Lincoln County, Kentucky: In August of 1782, Abraham Estes marched against the Indians who had just defeated Colonels’ Trigg and Todd at the Battle of the Blue Licks where they buried the dead.  The rest of the company returned to Lincoln County.  Abraham Estes was ordered to stay at Blue Lick’s as an Indian spy.  He was assigned to protect the stores of salt that were laid up there for the use of the District of Kentucky, McAfee’s Station under Capt. Moses Shelby, Isaac Shelby, Anthony Bledsoe and Abraham Tatum.

Lincoln County, Kentucky, by Turner Publishing, 2002, page 183

 

1781-1782, 1788, 1797 to 1802: Representative in House of Commons, North Carolina State Legislature: Absalom Tatom.

 

1791 June 29 – Davidson County, Tennessee: “Absolom Tatum, North Carolina No 11.  By an Act for the relief of the Officers and Soldiers of the Continental Line, inconsideration of the services of Major Absolom Tatum, one of the Commissioners Guard, granted unto said Tatum a tract of land containing 5000 acres in Davidson County on both sides of the west fork of Big Harpeth River near the county line.  Surveyed for said Absolom Tatum by James Sanders, D.S. agreeable to a Warrant No. (blank).  Entry dated 21 July 1784.  Feb. 16, 1786.”

Land Deed Genealogy of Davison County, Tennessee, 1783-1792, Volume 1, by Helen C. and Timothy R. Marsch, 1992, pg. 215.

 

1800 US Census of Orange County, Hillsborough, North Carolina: Absolem Tatom, male 45+ and no other members in household. 

 

Last Will of Absalom Tatom 17 December 1802; probated February 1803.

 

            I, Absalom Tatem of the Town of Hillsborough but now in the city of Raleigh do make, and ordain this my last Will and Testament in manner and forever following.

            I give and bequeath to my friends, John Hogg, Catlett Cambell, David Ray, William Kirtland, and Duncan Cameron my negroes George, Cate, Sally and her child with their future increase young George and Jack to them their Heirs, Executors and Administrators, in Trust and in confidence that they will use their best endeavors to procure them to be unanticipated and set free for meritorious services rendered to me.

            I give and bequeath to my said friends my Tract of Land and Plantation lying on the Chatham roads on the South side of Eno, with all the Stock of every kind  crop, provisions and plantation utensils, thereto belonging to them their Heirs, Executors and Administrators in trust nevertheless for the use and benefit of the Slaves named in the foregoing clause and the future increase of the female part of them; but at all times to be subject to the disposal and control of said Trusties to be disposed of in the most advantageous manner for said Slaves.

            I give and bequeath to Mary Willett, wife of William Willett of Williamson County in the State of Tennessee and to the child which she now has and which she may hereafter have five hundred acres of Land to be taken off the north-west corner of my Tract lying on Harpeth River in the County and State aforesaid, to them their Heirs and assigns forever.

            I give and bequeath to my nephew Samuel Goodwin of the Town of Fayetteville and his Heirs and assign forever my houses and lots in the Town of Hillsborough with all the appurtenances thereto belonging.

            I devise all the rest and residue of my Estate both real and personal of whatsoever kind or nature or wheresoever the same may be to my Executors herein after named to be sold at such time and in such manner as in their direction will be most advantageous for those for whom the proceeds are intended. 

            I give and bequeath to my eldest brother Barnet Tatom, the sum of two thousand dollars, to my nephew Samuel Goodwin, the sum of two thousand dollars, and to my Sister Elizabeth Hicks of Granville County the sum of one thousand dollars to be paid out of the proceeds of the sale above directed to be made.

            Item, I give and bequeath to my Brothers Abner Tatom, John Tatom, and William Tatom, each of sum of one thousand dollars to be paid out of the proceeds of the sales above directed to be made – but if either of my said Brothers should be dead at the time of making this will, then the sum hereby given and bequeathed to him shall (pass) to his legal Heirs.

            Item, I give and bequeath to the children or heirs of my deceased brother Abel Tatom the sum of one thousand dollars.   To the children of my deceased sister Henrietta Fullylove, or their legal representatives the sum of one thousand dollars.   To the children of my deceased Sister Kesiah Goodwin alias Newby, Samuel Goodwin excepted who is otherwise provided for the sum of one thousand dollars to be paid out the sale before directed to be made.   And in all these devised it is my will and desire that if any of the children of my deceased Brothers and Sisters shall have died leaving children, then that such children stand in the place of and represent their deceased parent; and it is further my Will and desire that in all these cases the sum of money given to the children of a deceased brother or sister be divided among them equally share and share alike.

            Item.  I give and bequeath to my said Nephew Samuel Goodwin, all the furniture and other things belonging to my House in Hillsborough except such as are specifically given awaqy to other persons, and it is my true meaning and intent that what is hereby given to the said Samuel Goodwin be held and considered to be over and above what I may have heretofore advanced to him or for his use.

            I give and bequeath to my friend John Hogg my Good Watch, Key and Seal.  I give and bequeath to my friend Duncan Cameron my Law Books.

            I devise my Executors to pay to Lelah - negro woman have the property of James Hogg Esquire the sum of twelve pounds, as a reward for her attention to my in my illness.

            Whereas two tracts of Land entered in the office of John Armstrong both in my name, one of which containing four thousand and five hundred and thirty acres or thereabouts was purchased and is apparently my property, but in reality is held to the use of sundry persons as will appear by papers in my possession.  It is my Will and desire that my Executors do convey to the persons, so interested their respective quotas, warranting only from Persons claiming by from or under me, but no further or otherwise – This other tract of Three thousand acres granted to me for my Services as commissioner a second time for laying out Army lands, of this I have sold five hundred acres to old Mr. (blank) Maclin of Davison County in the State of Tennessee, if not already conveyed to me by John Nickols and Gent. James Robertson by virtue of a Power of Attorney heretofore granted them for that purpose; it is my Will and desire that my Executors do convey to W. Maclin said lands out of such part of the Tract as he my chose – one half of the remainder belongs to Gent. Robertson as a compensation for this service in locating and Surveying said land, which I desire my Executors to convey to him or his Heirs.

            And for the purpose of ascertaining the true interests which William Moore and myself have in certain lands, lying in the County of Randolph, I think it right and just to declare that a tract of lands containing two hundred and fifty acres being a part of a tract known by the name of Lowes, and a tract of two hundred acres afterwards entered adjoining thereto on this locally and for which a Grant was obtained in my name alone, are the joint property of said William Moore and myself I held by us  Tenants in common; adjoining to these two tracts on the North in one containing eighty acres bought of one Ruck this is my sale property – after the War the said William Moore and myself entered joining a tract of Land in said County containing six hundred and forty acres including the cross roads leading from Salisbury to Fayetteville and from Randolph old Court House to Fishers Ferry on Yadkin River, a Grant was obtained my name along but W. Moore is equally concerned as tenant in common.

            It is further my Will and desire that after the death of old George and Kate his wife, the plantation devised in Trust for the use of my negroes shall be equally divided between Jack and Sally or their Heirs respectively, but if young George should perform to the satisfaction of my Trustees, they may at their pleasure give him an equal share with Jack and Sally or their Heirs in said tract of land, but the same during the lifetime of old George and Kate is not to be divided.

            In the management and disposal of my lands in the State of Tennessee, I recommend to my Executors to request the assistance of my friends, Major Abraham Murray and Gent. Daniel Smith, and desire that just compensation be made to them for whatever services they may render in relation thereto.     

            All the residue of my estate which shall remain after the payment of my debts and the legacies, herein specifically devised, I desire my be divided among and between my Brothers Barnet Tatom, Abner Tatom, John Tatom, William Tatom, my Sister Elizabeth Hicks, my nephew Samuel Goodwin, and the children of my decreased Brother Abel Tatom, and the children of my deceased Sister Henrietta Fullylove and Kesiah Goodwin, alias Newby, Samuel Goodwin excepted who is provided for as aforesaid, share alike; and where any of my Brothers are dead, it is my Will his children should represent him , and when any of the children of a Deceased Brother or Sister have died leaving children, it is my Will that the children of such deceased child should stand in his or her place and take accordingly.

 

            Lastly I constitute and appoint Samuel Goodwin, John Hogg, Catlett Campbell and Duncan Cameron Executors of this my last will and Testament hereby revoking all formers wills.  In Testimony of all which I have hereto set my hand and seal this 17th December 1802.  

            Signed, Sealed, Published and declared to be his last Will and Testament before us – Wm. Norwood, Ed. Jones, Lavin Alves,  W. F. Strudwick.   (signed). A. Tatom (seal).  

 

             I further make this a Codicil to my last Will and Testament.  I give and bequeath to Thomas Hogg the son of James Hogg of the Town of Hillsborough the sum of two hundred dollars, this sum I desire my Executors as soon as convenient to place at Interest upon good Security to be paid to him when he shall arrive at the age of twenty one years.  Signed, Sealed, Published and declared to be Codicil to his last Will and Testament on the 17 Dec. 1802.  Wm. Norwood, Ed. Jones, Lavin Alves, W. F. Strudwick.  (Signed) A. Tatom (seal)

 

            Orange County, February Term 1803.  The Execution of the foregoing last Will and Testament of Absalom Tatom, decd. Was duly proved by the Oath of Wm. Norwood a Subscribing witness thereto, also the Codicil was proved by the said Wm. Norwood, and ordered to be recorded.  Test. Jno. Taylor, C.C.

North Carolina Estate Files 1663-1779, Orange County, Files for Absalom Tatom on familysearch.org, ^225 to ^229 images. 

 

 When Absalom Tatom died, he had ample assets to handle his mortgages and debts.  Disposing his estate took years and was finally settled in 1829.   Later, his Tennessee lands on the Harpeth River were reviewed by the Tennessee Supreme Court for survey problems. 

North Carolina Estate Files 1663-1779, Orange County, Files for Absalom Tatom from familysearch.org, 490 images, familysearch.org.  This will be abbreviated AT (for Absalom Tatom) and image numbers as ^000; i.e. (AT ^324).

 

What happened to the Free Blacks of Absalom Tatom?

 

1810 US Census of Orange County, North Carolina: G. Tatom – Number of other free persons except Indians not taxed – 8; Number of slaves – 1; white persons - 0.

1820 US Census of Orange County, North Carolina: George Tatom - Following are free Negroes 1 male and 2(3?) females 0-14; 1 male and 2(3?) females 14-26, 1 female 26-46; 2 males and 1 female 45+. No slaves; no white persons.

1830 US Census of Orange County, North Carolina: Sally Tatom - Following are free colored: 2 males and 1 female 0-10; 1 male and 5 females 10-23; 1 female 36-54; 1 female 55-99; 1 slave; no white persons. 

 

(2). Barnett Tatom (1740/44 to >1821), son of John Tatom “I” (ca1715 to 1794), married on 20 August 1778 Granville County, North Carolina to Mary Thompson (county record).  During the probate of his brother Absalom Tatom, Barnett Tatom lived in Wilson County, Tennessee (AT ^246).   Absalom’s will stated Barnett was his eldest brother.  (But was Barnett older than Absalom?)  Barnett’s last known record was 5 May 1821 when he sold his legacy land the same day to Asa Tatum in Wilson County, Tennessee and turned over any further inheritance to Asa Tatum (AT ^122).   Barnett Tatom used the Tatum spelling.  Children’s names and will/estate administration for Barnett Tatom need to be found. 

 

1771 North Carolina – Granville County Tax: Barnett Tatom, John Tatom

1776 Early Kentucky Territory: “Robert Fleming, assignee of Burnard Tatum by Richard Calloway this day claimed a Settlement and preemption to a tract of land in the district of Kentucky lying on a branch of Muddy Creek to include a lick known by the name of the Little Blue Lick on the path from this place to the log lick by the said Tatums raising a Crop of Corn in the country in the year 1776.  Satisfactory proof being made to the court they are of Opinion that the said Fleming has a right to a settlement of 400 acres of land including the above location and the preemption of 1000 acres adjoining and the certificate issue accordingly.”  (Certificate for 1400 acres of land)

Certificate Book of the Virginia Land Commission 1779-1780 by the Kentucky Historical Society, 1981/1992, pg. 77  

1778 June 25 - Granville County, North Carolina: From Will Book – William Hicks relinquishes all rights, as per marriage contract with her, to the estate of his present wife Mourning, who was formerly the wife of John Hunt, deceased, and by whom she had the following named children, John, George, Samuel, James, Judith Hunt.  The estate she owned prior to her marriage to me consists of 196 acres of land whereon she lives, 7 negroes, 4 horses, 30 cattle, hogs, and household goods, all to go to her children by John Hunt:  Witnesses: Barnet Tatom, John Fullilove, John Tatom.  (WB-?/185)  This researcher (JRM) speculates that this will is much more important than it superficially appears.

Abstracts of Wills and Estate Records of Granville County, North Carolina by Zae Hargett Gwynn 1973, page 85. 

1783 October 29 – Granville County:  Barnet Tatom and wife Mary deeded land to Richard Wilkins (DB O/296)

Southern Kith and Kin by Jewel Davis Scarborough, 1958.

1784 North Carolina – Granville County Tax: Bernard Tatom

1785 April 22 - North Carolina: Revolutionary War Bounty Land Grant to Bernard Tatom, North Carolina, Private, 228 acres.  Barnet Tatom has a number of Tennessee land grants. 

Revolutionary War Bounty Land Grants, Lloyd DeWitt Bockstruck, 1996

1786 North Carolina State Census – Granville County, Fishing Creek District: Barnett Tatum – 1 w. male 21-60, 2 WM under 21 or above 60, 2 w. females any age

1787 and 1788 Davidson County, Tennessee: Two land grants to Barnard Tatom for 640 acres each, one being (somewhere) on the north side of Cumberland River and the other on the south side.  In 1793, “Bernard Tatum” has more land grants in Davidson and Summer Counties, Tennessee.

1788 Granville County, North Carolina tax: (1) Barnard Tatom, Tabb’s Creek District, 135 acres; William Tatom, Reed’s District, 140 acres; John Tatum, Dutch District, 80 acres.

Colonial and State Records of North Carolina, Volume 5, page 1270.

1788 July 28 – Summer County, Tennessee:  Indenture from Barnard Tatom of Granville County, North Carolina to Briten Fuller, 640 acres a tract in Davison County on the south side of Cumberland River on Spring Creek.  Witnesses: Anderson Pattillo, Samuel Fuller, Littleton Fuller. (DB 1/124)

1795-1796 Sumner County, Tennessee Tax: Barnard Tatum or Tatom

1798 Montgomery County, Tennessee tax: Barnard Tatum. 

1799 August 10 – Davidson County, Tennessee: “I, Barnard Tatum of York County, State of South Carolina convey unto Jacob Patton a tract of land containing 640 acres on the waters of West Harpeth in Davison County adjoining a survey of Major Absolam Tatum’s 5000 acre survey being a tract granted by the State of North Carolina dated 20 May 1793.”  Witnesses: Joseph Moore and John McClannahan.  4 Feb. 1799.  (DB D/108)

Land Deed Genealogy of Davidson County, Tennessee, 1779-1803, Volume 3, by Helen C. and Timothy R. Marsh, 1992, , page 122.

1800 US Census of York County, South Carolina: Bernard Tatem, 1 male and 2 females 0-10, 1 male 10-16, 2 males and 1 female 16-26, 1 female 26-45, 1 male 45+ 

1800 Montgomery County, Tennessee Tax; Barnard Tatum

1810 Wilson County, Tennessee: Barnard Tatum sold land.  In this same county was a Dabney Tatum, likely a son, in an 1804 tax record and in 1810 as bondsman for Abraham Whitson and Rutha Brown. 

The Reconstructed 1810 Census of Tennessee, Charles A. Sherrill, 2001.

1820 US Census of Wilson County, Tennessee: Barnite Tatum, 1 male 16-26, 1 male and 1 female 45+.   On same page as Dabney Tatum.

1821 May 5 – Wilson County, Tennessee: Letter from Barnard Tatum to executors of Absalom Tatom: Stated this day he sold his legacy land to Asa Tatum in Wilson County, Tennessee and turned over further inheritance to Asa Tatum (AT ^122).  

                       

Likely Children of Barnett Tatum and wife Mary Thompson include:

 

(i). Dabney Tatum (1779/80 per 1850 census to >1850+) - son of Barnett Tatum, has a marriage bond 9 January 1808 Wilson County, Tn. (county record) to Polly Whitson (1795/96 to >1850). 

 

1804 Wilson County, Tennessee Tax: Dabney Tatum

~1810 Wilson County, Tn: Dabney Tatum was bondsman for Abraham Whitson and Rutha Brown.  He also purchased land.

Reconstructed 1810 Census of Tennessee, by Charles A. Sherrill, 2001.

1830 US Census of Wilson County, Tn: Dabney Tatum – 2 males and 2 females 0-9, 1 female 10-15, 1 male and 1 female 26-44.

1840 US Census of Wilson County, Tn: Dabney Tatom – 1 male and 1 female 5-9, 1 female 10-14, 1 male 20-29, 1 male and 1 female 50-59. 

1850 US Census of Wilson County, Tn: Dabny Tatum 70 NC, Mary Tatum 56 Va, Franklin M. Tatum 17 Tn.   Next to Orren Tatum (31).

1856 Wilson County, Tn.  Dabney Tatum has a will filed here – not seen (WB #120)

 

(ii). Ira Tatum (__ to 1826) - son of Barnett Tatum, has a marriage bond 21 January 1816 Wilson County (county record) to Patsy Edings (1794/95 to <1860+).

 

1820 US Census of Gallatin, Sumner County, Tennessee: Irey Tatum 1 female 0-9, 2 females 16-25, 1 male 26-45

1826 July 24 – Sumner County, Tn:  Will abstract of Ira Tatum.  Wife Patsy – household and etc.  Land to be sold.  My children William Barnet (Tatum), Alfred Carroll (Tatum), Abner Marion Tatum to be educated to read write and arithmetic.  My daughter Eliza Ann (Tatum) to read and write.  Three sons not yet 15 years of age.  Dabney Tatum and John Eddins to be Executors.  Proved August 1826  (WB 2/42)

Sumner County, Tennessee Abstracts of Will Books 1-2 (1788-1842) on ancestry.com

1850 US Census of Sumner County, Tn: William B. Tatum 29 Tn, Sarah Tatum 26 Tn, Martha Tatum 3 Tn, Franklin Tatum 2 Tn, Martha Tatum 55 SC, Alfred Tatum 27 Tn.

1860 US Census of Cannon County, Tennessee: A. C. Tatum 34 Clergyman, Tn, Ann Tatum 24,  Tn, Mary Tatum 7 Tn, George Tatum 5 TN, Martha Tatum 3 Tn, Eliza Tatum 10/12 Tn, “Martha Tatom” 64 SC   

 

(iii) Asa Tatum (1791/80 to 1842/50) – son of Barnett Tatum, has a marriage bond to 22 September 1823 Wilson County, Tn. to Charlotte Harris (1801/1802 to >1850+) with surety Thos. Smith (county record).

 

1830 US Census of Wilson County, Tn: Asa Tatum - 1 male and 3 females 0-4, 1 male 5-9, 1 female 20-29, 1 male 30-39.

1840 US Census of Sumner County, Tn: Asa Tatum - 2 males 0-5, 1 male and 1 female 5-9, 1 male and 3 females 10-14, 1 male 15-19, 1 female 30-39, 1 male 40-49.

1850 US Census of Sumner County, Tn: Charlotte Tatum 48,Tn, Samuel Tatum 24 Tn, Sarah A. Tatum 23 Tn, Mary J. Tatum 22 Tn, Missouri Tatum 20 (f) Tn, Alfred Tatum 18 Tn, Robert Tatum 16 Tn, Malinda Tatum 14 Tn, Joseph Tatum 13 Tn, Elina? Tatum 11 (m) Tn, Nancy Tatum 8 Tn.

 

(3). Abel Tatom (died 1798 in Georgia), son of John Tatom “I” (ca1715 to 1794), married Milly Harris and lived in Wilkes County, Georgia.

 

1777 August 20 – Granville County, North Carolina: Giles Hudspeth of Surry County, North Carolina deeded land in Granville County to Abel Tatom of Granville County.  (DB L/179)

Kinfolks of Granville County, NC 1765-1826 by Zae Hargett Gwynee, 1977, page 35.

1785 – Wilkes County, Georgia Tax: Abel Tatom, 1 ½ polls, 1 slave, 203 acres

1785 April 20 - Georgia: Revolutionary War Bounty Land grant to Abner Tatom, 350 acres.

Revolutionary War Bounty Land Grants, Lloyd DeWitt Bockstruck, 1996

1798 November 3 – Lincoln County, Georgia: Milly Tatom was appointed to administer the intestate estate of Abel Tatom, deceased.  (WB B/14).  In 1802, the estate paid out debt money to Isaac Tatom his legacy and to Stoval Pool.

1801 – Lincoln County, Murray District: Milly Tatom

1805 – Lincoln County, Dooly District: Milly Tatom

1810 – Lincoln County: Milly Tatom 400 acres, 202 1/2 acres on Soap Creek

 

Children of Abel Tatom and wife Milly Harris

Most information from the Absalom Tatom probate:

 

(i). Isaac Tatom (died 1805).  In 9 November 1805, administrix for Isaac’s estate was Jane Tatom in Lincoln County, Georgia.    On 7 February 1807, appraisement of Jane Tatom’s estate took place (WB B/238).  By 1818, Silas Tatom was noted as guardian of Isaac Tatom’s children – Mary Tatom and John M. Tatom, both orphans of Isaac Tatom and wife Jane Tatom.     (WB B/341, AT ^242, ^246, ^43, ^285 children). 

 

(ii). Thomas Tatom (1789/90 to 1850++).  In 25 July 1805, Milly Tatom was guardian of Silas Tatom, Thomas Tatom, and Francis Tatom (WB B/322).  Thomas Tatom married 6 October 1808 Elbert County, Georgia to Sarah Davis (county record). In 4 November 1808, Thomas and Francis Tatom were still under legal guardianship of their mother, Milley Tatom.  In 1826, Thomas Tatom lived in Monroe County, Georgia during Absalom Tatom’s probate.  (AT ^336, ^242, ^132)  There is one rather odd letter stating Thomas Tatom was not a son of Abel Tatom but a son of Isaac Tatom. (AT ^164-165)

 

1850 US Census of Troup County, Georgia: Thos. Tatom 60 farmer Tn, Sarah Tatom 59 Tn, Nancy Tatum 39 Tn, George Tatom 23 Tn, (can’t read name) 21 (m) Tn John Tatum 19 Tn

 

(iii). Frances “Fanny” Tatom married Meshack Turner.  Lived in Lincoln County and February 1828 in Monroe County, Georgia during Absalom Tatom’s probate. (AB ^135)

 

(iv). Polly or Mary Tatom married Stovall Pool.  Mary Tatom Pool’s history is confused, but both Stovall and Mary Pool apparently died in Lincoln County, Georgia during the Absalom Tatom probate. (AT ^165, ^330).  They had a child named Bonetta Pool, born May 1808 with whom the grandmother Milly and others became guardians.   (AT ^342, ^242, ^246, ^165)

 

(v). Silas Tatom (1786/67 to >1850+).  Silas Tatom, Thomas Tatom, and Fanny Tatom (who married Mesheck Turner) were living in Lincoln County, Georgia and in February 1826 Monroe County, Georgia during the probate of Absalom Tatom (AT ^242).  Silas Tatom married 4 April 1816 Lincoln County, Georgia to Patsey Mayo (county record).

 

1820 US Census of Lincoln County, Georgia: Silas Tatom, 1 male 0-9, 1 male 10-16, 1 female 16-26, 1 male 26-45, 1 female 45+

1835 Troup County, Ga: “Silas Tatum, tax collector for Troup County” allowed said collector a credit of $127.50.

Acts Passed By General Assembly of Georgia, J. Johnston, 1836.

1850 US Census of District 699, Troup County, Ga: Silas Tatom 63 farmer, Ga, Martha W. Tatom 57 Ga, Isaac N? Tatom 32 farmer, Ga.

 

(4). John Tatom, “II” or Jr. (ca1760 to 30 November 1830 Lincoln County, Ga.), son of John Tatom “I” (ca1715 to 1794).  “John Tatom, “II” married 1st to Martha Hicks 1 August 1782 in Granville County, North Carolina (county record).  He married 2nd date uncertain in Lincoln County, Georgia to Rebecca Stovall (ca1780 to after 1850).   During the lengthy probate of Absalom Tatom, John Tatom “II” lived in Lincoln County, Georgia.   It appears that John Tatom “II’s” youngest son (John H. Tatum) was born about 1820/21 when his father was about the age 60 and his 2nd wife Rebecca Stovall was about age 40-42.  

 

1784 North Carolina – Granville County Tax: John Tatom, Jr.

1801 & 1805 Lincoln County, Georgia Tax: John Tatom

1810 Lincoln County, Georgia Tax: John Tatom with 250 acres + 100 acres, 10 slaves, Mill Creek.

1820 US Census of Lincoln County, Ga: 3 males and 1 female 0-9, 1 male and 1 female 10-16, 1 female 16-25, 1 male and 1 female 26-45, 1 male 45.  

1825 November 5 – Lincoln County, Georgia:  Will of John Tatom (brief abstract) bequeaths to wife Rebecca most of estate; to daughters Susannah Morgan, Nancy Harris, Katherine Floyd, Emily Zellars, Henrietta Tatom, Elizabeth Tatom, Aurilla Redmonds; to sons Wiley G. Tatom, Leroy Tatom, Benjamin Franklin Tatom, Abner Tatom, Joseph W. Tatom, William S. Tatom, John H. Tatom.  Some children need further education, but will does not name them.  Executrix to be wife Rebecca Tatom.  Witnesses: Charles Nathan, James E. Todd. John McDowde.  Entered 5 January 1831. (WB D 246/250 - online familysearch.org)

1830 US Census of Lincoln County, Ga: John Tatom - 1 male 5-9, 1 male and 1 female 10-15, 1 male 15-20, 1 male and 1 female 20-30, 1 female 50-60, 1 male 60-70

1840 US Census of Lincoln County, Ga: Mrs. Rebekah Tatom, 1 male 15-19, 1 male 20-29, 1 female 60-69.

1850 US Census of Lincoln County, Ga: Rebecca Tatom 68 NC, John H. Tatom 29 Ga, Elizabeth Starke 35 Ga.   

 

Children of John Tatum “II” (ca 1760 to 1830)

 

(i). Susannah Tatom, married a Morgan

(ii). Nancy Tatom married 19 October 1813 Lincoln County, Georgia to Joseph Harris (county record).

(iii). Catharine Tatom married 9 January 1820 or 1835 Lincoln County, Georgia to Alexander Floyd (county record).

(iv). Emily Tatom, married a Zellars

(v). Henrietta Tatom

(vi). Elizabeth Tatom

(vii). Aurilla Tatom married 18 February 1806 Lincoln County, Georgia to John Edmonds (county record, but misspelled)

 

(viii). Wiley G. Tatom (1791/1800 to 1840/50) married about 1820 to Nancy Zellars (17 November 1795) and lived in Lincoln County, Georgia.

 

1812-1815 Georgia: Wylie G. Tatom, Private, 1st Regiment (Harris’) Georgia Militia.

US War of 1812 Service Records 1812-1815, Ancestry.com

1818 Lincoln County, Georgia Tax: G. Willey Tatom

Georgia 1792-1819 Tax Lists Index, ancestry.com

1830 US Census of District 185, Lincoln County, Georgia: Wiley G. Tatom, 2 males 0-5, 3 males 5-9, 1 male and 1 female 30-39.

1840 US Census of Lincoln County, Georgia: Wiley G. Tatom, 1 female 0-5, 1 female 5-9, 2 males 10-14, 3 males 15-19, 1 male 20-29, 1 male and 1 female 40-49

1850 US Census of Lincoln County, Georgia: Nancy Tatom 56, Ga, Sherwood Tatom 20 overseer, Tn, Fulvia M. Tatum 18 G (f), Ann A. Tatom 13 Ga.  Two entries from Joseph B. Ware who was next to Wylie G. Tatom in the 1840 census.  This clue points us to the correct Wiley Tatom wife.   Also, on same page as William S. Tatom, age 35.

 

(ix). Leroy Tatom (1791/94 to 1840/50) married 19 January 1818 Marion County, Mississippi (county record) to Elizabeth Stovall (1787 to after 1860+ and buried Terry Cemetery, Hinds Co, Ms. per findagrave.com).  Leroy Tatom was a farmer and settled in Hinds Co., Mississippi.

 

1820 US Census of Pike County, Mississippi: Leroy Tatum, 2 females 0-9, 1 female 10-16, 1 male 16-25, 1 male and 1 male 26-45.

1830 US Census of Hinds County, Mississippi: Leroy Tatom, 1 male and 1 female 0-5, 1 male 5-9, 1 female 10-14, 1 male 30-40, 1 female 40-50.

1830 December 1 – Mississippi State Land Patent: Leroy H. Tatum, 80.5 acres, T6N/R2W/S15, W1/2W1/4.  Document 3702.  Leroy H. Tatom has 5 more land grants for a total of 478 acres in Hinds County, in sections 14, 21, and 22x3.

BLM-Glo Records. 

1840 US Census of Hinds County, Mississippi: Leroy Tatum, 1 male 0-5, 2 males and 1 female 10-15, 1 male and 1 female 16-19, 1 male and 1 female 20-29, 1 male 30-39, 1 male 40-49, 1 female 50-60, 1 female 80-90. (page 203)

1850 US Census of Hinds County, Mississippi: Elizabeth Tatum (widow), 64 NC, John F. Tatum 22 Ms.  Census records from 1820-1850 show no other Tatoms nearby.

(possibly) 1860 US Census of Hinds County, Ms: J. M. Children 50? farmer, SC and family including E. Tatom 74 Ga.

 

(x). Benjamin Franklin Tatom

(xi). Abner Tatom

 

(xii). Joseph W. Tatom (1808/10 to 1850/60 ) married about 1832 Mississippi to Carolina A. __ (1813/14 to >1860+).  They farmed in Hinds County, Mississippi. 

 

1840 US Census of Hinds County, Mississippi: J. W. Tatum, 1 male and 1 female 0-4, 2 males and 1 female 5-9, 1 male and 1 female 20-20.  

1850 US Census of Hinds County, Mississippi: Joseph W. Tatom 40 Ga farmer, Caroline A. Tatom 36 Ms, John H. Tatom 14 Ms, Ermissenda? R. or H. Tatom 12 Ms, Carolina (A.) Tatom 10 Ms, Joseph W. Tatum 6 Ms, Emily H. Tatom 3 Ms, William E. Ratliff 21 Ms, Anna Ratliff 18 Ms, James Ratiff 16 Ms.

1860 US Census of Hinds Co., Ms: C. A. Tatom 46 (f) Ms, E. R. Tatom 21 (f) Ms, C. E. Tatom 19 (f) Ms, J. Warren Tatom 15 (m) Ms, E. H. Tatom 12 (f) Ms, T. G. Tatom 9 (m) Ms, H. Tatom 8 (f) Ms; J. F. Tatom 23 farmer (m) Ms; A. A. Tatom 18 (f). Ms.   Who are these last two?

 

(xiii). William S. Tatom (1814/15 to after 1880) married 16 February 1843 Lincoln County, Georgia (county record) as “William S. Tatom Esqr.” to Miss. Catherine Parks (1 October 1818 or January 1819 to 2 December 1900).   

 

1850 to 1880 US Census of Lincoln County, Georgia.  William S. and wife Katherine and children.  Farm hands and managers included Thomas Davis, age 16 in 1850, James Henderson 24. 

1900 US Census of Sybert, District 35, Lincoln County, Ga: Joseph Tatom January 1845, 55, married 27 years, Cynthia A. Tatum, wife, March 1846 54, married 27, George L. Tatom, son, Oct. 1875, 24, Elizabeth C. Tatom dau, Dec. 1878 21 Ga, William A. Tatom son Jan. 1880 20, Catharine Tatom mother, born January 1819, age 81 Ga, widow, 7 children, 5 living. 

 

Children of William S. Tatom and Katherine Parks, per census records: (1a). William G. Tatom (1844/46), (2a). Joseph Warren Tatom (January 1845), (3a) Wiley G. Tatom (1846/47), (4a) Thomas F. or Thomas L. Tatom (1848/49), (5a). Elizabeth Tatom (1851/52), (6a). John Tatom (1853/54), (7a). Rebecca E. Tatum 1852/53, (8a), Emily or Emma C. Tatom (1857/58),

 

(xiv). John H. Tatom (1820/21) married 21 July 1859 Lincoln County, Ga. to Barbary A. Zellars (county record).  

 

(5). William Tatom (died about January 1804, last residence - Vienna, Abbeville District, South Carolina), son of John Tatom “I” (ca1715 to 1794), married Polly__.   Polly by 1808 married 2nd to Williamson Norwood and they are noted living in Abbeville District, South Carolina.  William Tatom’s will named one son, Orval or Orville Tatom but no other brothers or sisters are mentioned or listed on the Absalom Tatom probate.  Absalom Tatom’s will indicates his brother William Tatom was living in 17 December 1802, but later died during the probate proceedings.   (AT^246, ^349, ^353).  In May 1826, (only) Orville Tatom and Williamson Norword of Abbeville District claimed legacy of William Tatom’s portion of the Absalom Tatom estate (AT ^134).  

 

Details for William and Polly Tatom:

Granville County - Must be separated from another William Tatom, son of Stephen Tatom

 

(possibly) 1784 May 4 – Granville County: William Ross and wife Elizabeth, and William Tatom and wife Margaret sold land jointly to Rowland Gooch.  (DB O/316)

Kinfolks of Granville County, North Carolina 1765-1826 by Zae Hargett Gwynn 1974,

(possibly) 1784 – Granville County Tax: William Tatom

1786 Wilkes County, Franklin Section, Georgia: William Tatum in Capt. Harrington’s District along with John Tatom and Abner Tatom.

1789 February 2- Georgia Deed: Elijah Clarke and wife Hannah of Wilkes County sold to John Clarke, Jr. of same county for 500 lbs., 2300 acres in Franklin County on both sides of Sandy Creek adjoining Wilie Pope and Benjamin Talliaferro, Samuel Patton and William Tatom.  Witnesses. W.J. L. K. Pope, Thomas Wooten J.P.  (Franklin County DB C/32)

Early Records of Franklin County, Georgia by Lois Helmers, page 13

1799 June 13 – Wilkes County: William Tatom, plat for 500 acres on Cripple Creek, Greenville County, Washington District, Surveyed by Benjamin Arnold.

South Carolina State Archives online, Series S213192, Vol 37/293, item 2.

1800 US Census of Abbeville, South Carolina: William Tatom, 1 male 0-10, 1 male 16-25, 1 male 26-44, 1 female 16-25.

1803 Abbeville District, South Carolina: Will of William Tatom (brief abstract) of the Town of Vienna, Abbeville District, South Carolina.  House and lot I now live in, if necessary, be applied to my debts.  Remainder equally divided with my wife Polly and my son Orval when he arrives at age 21 and he is to receive education.  Executrix to be wife Polly and executors to be Donald Fraser and John Hughes.  Witnesses: John N. Newby, Williamson Norwood, and A. Tatom.  Entered 15 February 1804.  (WB 1/289/290, 1787-1815)

 

(6). Henrietta Tatom (died ~1793 Georgia), daughter of John Tatom “I” (ca1715 to 1794).   Married John Fullilove, also spelled Fullerlove, Fullylove and had the following children:

(i). John Fullilove lived in Oglethorp County, Georgia during Absalom Tatom’s probate (AT ^246, ^473).

(ii). Susannah Fullilove married Benjamin Taylor and lived in Oglethorp County, Gerogia during Absalom Tatom’s probate (AT ^246, ^473).

(iii). Kesiah or Keziah Fullilove married William Ford and lived in Oglethorp County, Georgia during Absalom Tatom’s probate (AT ^246, ^473).

(iv). Temp Fullilove married John Taylor and lived in Clark County, Georgia during Absalom Tatom’s probate (AT ^246, ^473).

(v) Ludwell Fullilove lived in Wilkes County, Georgia during Absalom Tatom’s probate (AT ^246, ^473).

(vi). Sally Fullilove married John Pope (AT ^473)

(vii). Nancy Fullilove married Absalom Davis lived in Elbert County, Georgia during Absalom Tatom’s probate.  Nancy Davis noted she was a widow in July 1826 letter to Absalom Tatom executors.  (AT ^246, ^473).

(viii). Thomas Fullilove lived in Orangeburg District, South Carolina during Absalom Tatom’s probate (AT ^246, ^473).

(ix). Jemima Fullilove married Benjamin Pulliam and lived in Franklin County, Georgia at the time of Absalom Tatom’s probate  (AT ^470, ^473, ^246).   On 6 October 1807, Benjamin Pulliam of Franklin County gave Abner Tatom of Lincoln County, legal power to get the Absolom Tatum inheritance that fell to his wife Jemima Fullilove, daughter of Henrietta Fullilove, deceased.**

 North Carolina Estate Files 1663-1779, Orange County, Files for Absalom Tatom on familysearch.org, 490 pages.  Will be abbreviated AT (for Absalom Tatom) and image numbers as ^000.

** Early Records of Franklin County, Georgia by Lois Helmers 2014, page 181

 

(7). Elizabeth Ann Tatom, daughter of John Tatom “I” (ca1715 to 1794), married 24 March 1778 Granville County to William Hicks.  During Absalom Tatom’s probate, they lived in Orange County, North Carolina (AT 246).

 

(8). Abner Tatom (born 15 October 1755 and died 1819 in Madison County, Alabama), son of John Tatom “I” (ca1715 to 1794), married Mary Currin 1780 Granville County, North Carolina.  The probate of brother Absalom Tatom indicated that Abner Tatom lived at some point in “Madison County, Mississippi Territory” (AT ^246).   Comment: Madison County, yes, which was originally Mississippi Territory and became Alabama Territory.

 

Leonard Andrea of Columbia, S.C. says, ‘Abner Tatom was the first clerk of the Superior Court of Lincoln County, Georgia and the above family is found inscribed by him on one page of the Clerk of Court Records.’  Abner Tatom was from Norfolk, Virginia and went to Granville County, NC; then to 96 Dist., SC; to Lincoln County, Georgia; and then to Madison County, Alabama.”

Old Southern Bible Records; Transcriptions of Births, Deaths, and Marriages, edited by Memory Lee Aldredge Lester, pages 302-303

 

Details for Abner Tatom and wife Mary Currin

 

1785 Wilkes County, Georgia Tax: Abner Tatum, 1 poll, 350 acres; next to John Tatum.

1786 March 10 – Franklin County, Georgia: On 9 May 1795, James R. Whitney, Tax Collector of Franklin County sold to John Cobbs, 200 acres surveyed for Abner Tatum 10 March 1786 and sold for arrears in taxes. (DB PP/7)

Early Records of Franklin County, Georgia, by Lois Helmers, 2014, page 128.

1793 Wilkes County, Georgia: Muster roll of a Detachment of militia infantry under the command of Lt. Samuel Crawley, Lieut. Colonel; William Triplett’s Regiment, Wilkes County, State of Georgia, in the service of the United States, from May 22 to June 18, 1793:  (included) Sergeant Abner Tatom

American Militia in the Frontier Wars, 1790-1796, by Murtie June Clark, page 226.

1801 and 1805 Lincoln County, Georgia Tax: Abner Tatom

1815 and 1816 Madison County, Alabama Territory tax: Abner Tatem.   

1816 Madison County, Mississippi Territory in Alabama Tax: Abner Tatem

1819 September Term Court – Madison County, Georgia: Mary Tatom (wife), Barnett Tatom and John Tatom (sons) named in the last will of Abner Tatom became the executors and executrix of the last will of Abner Tatom (AB ^125).

Undated, location _:  Executors Bond for Abner Tatom Estate included Mary Tatom, Barnett Tatom, John Tatom, Joshua Falconer, William Lamkin and John M. Looney, all of Madison County.

Southern Kith and Kin: A Record of My Children’s Ancestors, by Jewel Davis Scarborough, 1958, 373-374

           

Bible Record – Abner Tatom. “Abner Tatom (or Tatum), 5th child of John Tatom, Sr. & his wife Ann Wright of Norfolk, Virginia, b. 15 October 1755, married 3 May 1780 Mary Currin.”   But is the Norfolk part accurate?  

 

Children of Abner Tatom + Mary Currin, from Bible Record:

 

(i) Elizabeth Ann Tatom (20 March 1781)

 

(ii) James Tatom (23 February 1783) married as James Tatam 20 November 1818 Lincoln County, Ga., to Elizabeth Bibb (county record).  He is on the 1810 Lincoln County Tax with 400 acres on Soap Creek.   In 1823, James Tatom deeded 213.5 acres plat on Johnson’s Creek, Abbeville District, surveyed by William Robertson.  (S.C. State Archives online, S213192, 47/65/002)

 

(iii) Absalom Tatom (7 August 1785) married 16 March 1809 Lincoln County, Ga., to Eliza W. Gonsham or Gresham (county record).   He is on the 1810 Lincoln County Tax with one 2 wheel carriage with 131 acres.

 

(iv) Cynthia Tatom (7 March 1788)

(v) Barnett Tatom (14 February 1791) married 10 July 1820 in Madison County, Alabama to Mary S. Underwood.

(vi) John Tatom (17 November 1793)

(vii) Nancy Tatom (10 June 1798)

(viii) William Tatom (29 November 1801 to 2 November 1802)

 

(9). Keziah Tatom, daughter of John Tatom “I” (ca1715 to 1794), married 1st to Jesse Newby. *  She married 2nd to Samuel Goodwin (Jr.) 29 March 1773 in Granville County, North Carolina (county record).   ^^Samuel Goodwin, Sr.’s will in 1774 named wife Kezia, son Samuel, father-in-law John Tatom, brother, Lemuel.  Proved 4 January 1775 Granville County, North Carolina. ^^  Keziah was deceased by the time of Absalom Tatom’s December 1802 will.  Samuel Goodwin (Jr.) moved to Wake County, North Carolina (State Capitol) and was a key executor of Absalom Tatom’s will.   Children of Keziah Tatom and husband Jesse Newby are:

(i). John N. Newby of Abbeville District, South Carolina during Absalom Tatom’s probate.

(ii). Larkin Newby

(iii). Henrietta Newby married Robert Rainford and lived in Fayetteville, North Carolina.  (AT ^246)

(iv). Hezekiah Newby.  “One of four children, deceased,” per March 1823 probate letter (AT ^56).

* There are several Jesse Newbys to separate.

 

(II). Stephen Tatom “I” (estimated birth date reported 1721 by Arvis Tatom and died 1789 Orange County, North Carolina), son of ??? Tatom (born ca1680/90 and died __.)   Walter J. Tatom reported that he married Mourning __ in King William County, Virginia, then lived Spotsylvania County, Virginia   His son William Tatom stated he moved to Orange County, North Carolina about 1776 when he was age 16.  Presumption here is that William moved with his father Stephen Tatom.  Stephen and Mourning Tatom had 10 children. *   Stephen used the “Tatom” spelling.

* Stephan Tatom and His Descendants, by Walter J. Tatom and John Plath Green, 1971.     

This writer has only seen several short excerpts, but not the out-of-print book.  King William County info is likely but still speculative.  Spotsylvania County was established in 1720, in part from King William County.  

 

1746 May 29: From Virginia Gazette: Ran away on the 22nd of this month, from the __ in King William County, Irish…man named Patrick Carrell.  He a short sly fellow….   He took with him, a pair of leather bags which were stuffed and plenty of money, not his own and…a bridle and English double skirted saddle crupper made of Virginia leather, belong to Mr. Stephen Tatum, who will reward any person for intelligence on him.   He will endeavor to get over the James River in order to get to Carolina or Sherando….

Virginia Gazette, 29 May 1746, Library of Virginia microfilm.

1760 January 11 – Spotsylvania County: son William Tatom was born this date and location, per his Revolutionary War pension application.

1762 March 8 – Louisa County, Virginia: Deed from William and Elizabeth Garrett of Spotsylvania County to Joseph Boxley, 400 acres lying in Trinity Parish, Louisa County.  Witnesses were Wm. Spiller, George Pottie, John Longan and Stephen Tatum. (DB C/114)

Family Archive Viewer CD186, Va. Genealogies #2, 1600’s-1800’s, under Boxley

1765 August 17 - Spotsylvania County, Virginia:  William Garrett and Elizabeth his wife of Spotsylvania County deeded to James to James Rawley of Hanover County 200 acres in St. George Parish.  Witness included Stephan Tatom.

Virginia Land, Marriage, and Probate Records 1639-1850 on ancestry.com

1765 October 4 – Spotsylvania County, Virginia: Thomas Lane and Ann his wife of Spotsylvania County deeded to Stephen Tatom of same County for 25 currency 150 acres in St. George Parish.

Virginia Land, Marriage, and Probate Records 1639-1850 on ancestry.com

1771 November 21 – Spotsylvania County, Virginia: Stephen Tatom (or Tatum), and Mourning, his wife, of Spotsylvania County, deeded to Richard Blanton and George Anderson, of same County, 45 currency, 150 acres in Spotsylvania County.

Virginia Land, Marriage, and Probate Records 1639-1850 on ancestry.com

1779 – Orange County, North Carolina Tax: Stephen Tatum

1789 June 9 – Orange County, North Carolina: Will of Stephen Tatom.   Wife: Mornin.  Sons: Stephen and John, lands on Camp Creek.  William – 1 shilling.   Daughters: Sarah, Anna, Elizabeth, Francis Rizia, Mary, Jemima.  Executors: “trusty friends Towland Gooch and John Wilburn.  Witnesses: William “x” Tatom. (Book B, p. 73)

1790 substitute US Census of Orange County, North Carolina: Mourning Tatom.

 

Children of Stephen Tatom “I” (~1721 to 1789) + and wife Morning, per will.

 

(1). Stephen Tatom “II,” son of Stephen Tatom “I” and Morning Tatom.  Stephen Tatom married 27 December 1799 Granville County to Salley Owen (county record). 

 

1802 Franklin County, Georgia tax: Stephen Tatum.  Same location as brother John Tatum 1800, 1802.

 

(2). Sarah Tatom - daughter of Stephen Tatom “I” (~1721 to 1789) and Morning Tatom

(3). Anna Tatom - daughter of Stephen “I” (~1721 to 1789) and Morning Tatom

(4). Elizabeth Tatom - daughter of Stephen “I” (~1721 to 1789) and Morning Tatom.  Following may or may not belong here: Elizabeth Tatom married 17 November 1779 in Granville County, North Carolina to Fowler Jones, with John Tatom – bondsman.

 

Fowler Jones also was bondsman to William Tatem – Margret Wright marriage on 29 December 1781 and to John Tatom - Peggy Phillips marriage on 13 January 1781, all taking place in Granville County, North Carolina.   

 

(5). Francis Tatom (f) - daughter of Stephen “I” (~1721 to 1789) and Morning Tatom  May or may not belong here: Frances Tatum married 10 August 1792 Granville County to Joseph Ellis.

(6). Rizia Tatom is (probably) Kezia Tatom - daughter of Stephen “I” (~1721 to 1789) and Morning Tatom

 

(possibly) 1810 US Census of Orange County, North Carolina: Keziah Tatum, 1 male and 1 female 0-10, 1 female 10-16, 2 females 26-45.  Next to William Tatum.

 

(7). Mary Tatom - daughter of Stephen “I” (~1721 to 1789) and Morning Tatom

(8). Jemima Tatom - daughter of Stephen “I” (~1721 to 1789) and Morning Tatom

 

(9). John Tatom  (~1758 to 3 August 1824) – son of Stephen “I” (~1721 to 1789) and Morning Tatom, has a marriage bond 1st  on 13 January 1781 Granville County to Peggy Phillips and had one child Polly Tatum born 23 December 1782.  In 20 October 1783 Granville County, North Carolina, he has a marriage bond to Mary Wright (county record).   The estimated birth date ~1758 derives from brother William Tatom who stated he was born in 1760 and John was older than him.  A strong question arises whether his widow Mary Wright married 2nd to William Tatom, brother to John, but marriage date seems not compatible.   Two Mary Wrights married to John Tatom and William Tatum did successfully obtain widow pensions in Dickson County, Tennessee on November 1850 and 5 July 1853. 

 

(probably) 1781 January 13 – Granville County: Marriage bond of John Tatom to Peggy Phillips with Fowler Jones, bondsman and Asa Search, witness.

1783 October 20 – Granville County, North Carolina: John Tatom married Mary Wright with witnesses being James Cash, bm; Henry Pottert (county record). 

1784 Granville County Tax, included John Tatom, John Tatom, Jr, William Tatom

1786 North Carolina State Census of Granville County, Dutch District:  John Tatom, 1 male 21-60; 1 male under 21 or over 60, 1 female any age.  This fits as John Tatom had one son - James Tatom, born 12 February 1785. Also in Dutch District is William Tatom.

1788 Granville County, North Carolina tax: (1) Barnard Tatom, Tabb’s Creek District, 135 acres; (2) William Tatom, Reed’s District, 140 acres; (3). John Tatum, Dutch District, 80 acres.

Colonial and State Records of North Carolina, Volume 5, page 1270.

1799 - Georgia: John Tatom’s son, Richard Tatom was born here per census records; also Pension Application confirms John lived in Georgia.

1800, 1802 Franklin County, Georgia tax: John Tatum.  Brother Stephen Tatum is here in 1802.

1809 July 19 – Hickman County, Tennessee: James Robertson of Davidson County, Tennessee deeded to John Tatum of Dickson County for $206, land lying in Dickson County on the West Fork of Pine River…to Lewis Russel’s southwest corner…crossing Pine River.  It being the whole of a grant issued by the State of Tennessee to the said James Robertson, Grant Number 331 on 5 August 1808.  Entered 26 February 1810. (DB A/27 copy, original DB A/142) 

~1810 Hickman and Dickson Counties, Tennessee: John Tatum, also found in Hickman County deed, p. A41.  Also, (son) Stephen Tatum is a Hickman County witness, p. 89 (same source)

Reconstructed 1810 Census of Tennessee, Charles A. Sherrill, 2001; his source Hickman County Deed Book A (1808-1811) and B (1811-1813, typescript 1937 Works Progress Administration Collection at TSLA, Nashville.

1820 US Census of Dickson County: John Tatum, Sr. 1 male 16-18, 2 males and 1 female 16-26, 1 male and 1 female 45+.   Next to him is Steven Tatum and nearby is son James Tatum.

1830 US Census of Dickson County: Mary Tatum – 2 females 15-19, 1 female 60-69.  She is next to sons Stephen Tatom and Richard Tatom.  

1850 November 3 – Dickson County Tennessee:  (Summarized) Widow’s American Revolutionary Pension Application for widow, Mary Tatum, resident of Dickson County, age 75.   Her husband was John Tatum, whom she married October 1783.   John Tatum died 3 August 1824 in Dickson County.  He enlisted sometime in the year 1778 and served more than 3 years in Orange or Granville County militia, which included Capt. (possibly Tilghman) Dixon and Lt. (possibly William) Walton who were possibly commanded by Col. Elbert.   John Tatum was at the Battle of Monmouth (New Jersey) and the fall of Charleston.

 

William Tatum, Senior, brother to John Tatum, appeared in open Court and stated that John Tatom returned home to Granville County about 3 years after his enlistment and then volunteered for two more short tours of duty, the last being at Hillsboro, Orange County, to make shoes for the soldiers.  William Tatum, Senior was not present at the marriage of his brother.  John and Mary Tatum had 11 children and lived in same neighborhood as William Tatum.   After leaving North Carolina, John moved first to Georgia and then to Dickson County, Tennessee where he died.  

 

Included in the pension file is the following Bible record which is “almost illegible:”  John Tatum was born (illegible), Mary Tatum was born 24 April 1767, Polly Tatum born 23 December 1782**,  James Tatum born 12 February 1785, John Tatum born 8 April 1787, Salley Tatum born 24 August 1789, William Tatum born March (illegible)*, Betsy Tatum born July (illegible), Stephen Tatum born 27 November 1797, Richard Tatum born 22 August 1799, George, born 22 October 1802, Nancy (originally named Margaret, but christened “Nancy”) born 9 January 1805, (remainder unreadable except from 1808(?), but reported by others to be Jemima, Susan)  Added at the bottom is “Cut from the Family Bible of John Tatum, dec’d this 14th day of May 1842.  (Pension Application W999, Mary fn65NC.)

* Original reviewed and name is William Tatum, not Wilkins Tatum.

** John Tatum had a least one child, Polly Tatum (born 23 December 1782) by his first marriage.’ 

 

SAR Revolutionary War Graves Register, 2000 edition states John Tatum was born 1762 and died 1824, burial in Dickson County, Tennessee.  Wife was Mary Wright.  

 

Children of John Tatom (~1758 to 1824) per pension application: (ia), (i) through (xi)

Grandchildren of Stephen “I” (~1721 to 1789) and Morning Tatom

(Notice that John Tatom and brother William have a son Richard Tatom)

 

(ia). Polly Tatom (23 December 1782) from a 1st marriage John Tatom to Peggy Phillips.

(i). James Tatom (12 February 1785 and died ~1850 Dickson County, Tennessee), son of John Tatom (~1758 to 1824) + Mary Wright.  James Tatom reportedly married 1st about 1802 to Ann Baker (needs proof) and 2nd about 1834 to Lucinda __.        

 

1820 US. Census of Dickson County: James Tatum – 3 males and 2 females 0-10, 1 male 10-15, 1 male and 1 females 26-44.

1830 US Census of Dickson County: James Tatom – 1 female 0-4, 2 females 5-9, 1 male and 1 female 10-14, 1 male and 1 female 15-19, 1 male 20-29, 1 male 40-49.  

1831 October 5 – Dickson County: James Tatom has three Tennessee Land Warrants for 233 acres on or near Pine River followed in 1835 with an additional 100 acres on Garner’s Creek.   

1850 Dickson County administrator’s settlements (as-c-78), not seen.

1850 US Census of Dixon County, Middle District: Lucinda Tatom 40 Ky, Wm. B. Tatom 15 farmer, Tn, Lucinda D. Tatom 13 Tn, Epps J. Tatom 9 Tn, Montgomery B. Tatom 5 Tn, Margaret Tatom 25 Tn.

 

Children of James Tatom (1785 to ~1846 Dickson County, Tennessee);

(1a to 7a – 1st wife and 8b to 11b – 2nd Lucinda __)

 

(1a). Green Tatom 2 September 1809 to 6 August 1892 Dickson County and buried Wills Cemetery, Dickson Co., Tn.) married about 1831 to Mary A.  __ (name varies, ~1808).   Surname spelled Tatum in cemetery listing of findagrave.com.

(2a). Elizabeth “Betty” Tatom ~1810

(3a). John A. Tatom 1812

(4a). Willis Tatom (~1816 to 1889) married 1st on 31 October 1853 Dickson County to Jane Bowen (county record) and 2nd on 2 November 1854 Dickson County to Rebecca J. Bowen (county record).

(5a). Sarah Tatom ~1818

(6a). James A. Tatom (December 1819 to April 1902 Eureka Springs, Carroll County, Arkansas.) married on 29 July 1840 Dickson County to Anne Tatom (county record).   In 1850, they are living in Dickson County next to his Uncle - Benjamin Tatum.

(7a). Margaret Tatom 1824/1825

 

(8b). William B. Tatom 1834/1835

(9b). Lozenzo Dow Tatom  (November 1836) married 3 August 1856 Dickson County to Lucinda Waynick (county record).  In 1880, they lived in Houston County, Tennessee.

(10b) Epps Jackson Tatom (31 May 1841 to 1884) married Susan H. __ and in 1880 they lived in Humphreys County, Tennessee

(11b) Montgomery B. Tatom, 1844/1845 to 1880.   

 

Continued - Children of John Tatom (~1758 to 1824)

Grandchildren of Stephen Tatom “I” (~1721 to 1789)

 

(ii). John Tatom (born 8 April 1787), son of John Tatom (~1758 to 1824)   

(iii). Sally Tatom (24 August 1789), daughter of John Tatom (~1758 to 1824)

(iv). Betsy or Elizabeth Tatom (born July __) - daughter of John Tatom (~1758 to 1824).

(v). Nancy Tatom (originally named Margaret, but christened “Nancy” born 9 or 11 January 1805) - daughter of John Tatom (~1758 to 1824) 

(vi and vii - possibly). Jemima Tatom and Susan Tatom - daughters of John Tatom (~1758 to 1824)

 

(viii). William Tatom (born ~1790 NC and died 30 September 1844 Johnson County, Arkansas) - son of John Tatom (~1758 to 1824) and grandson of Stephen Tatom (~1721 to 1789).  Reported to have married about 1815/17 to Elizabeth Richardson (1796 to 12 August 1861 Hunt County, Texas), daughter of Thomas Richardson.  Children were born in Dickson County, Tennessee.  A full write-up on William Tatom, Jr. and Elizabeth Richardson is found on Dickson-online.com/?p=364

 

1820 US Census of Dickson County, Tennessee: “William Tatum, Jr:  2 males and 1 female 0-10, 1 female 10-15, 1 female 16-25, 1 male 26-44.  Legal terminology in counties use senior and junior to separate two persons with the same name, not necessarily son and father.

1830 – Dickson County, Tennessee

1840 Spadra, Johnson County, Arkansas

1850 US. Census of Johnson County, Arkansas: Elizabeth Tatom 53 NC, Alford Tatom 23 Tn; Marian Tatom 17 Tn, Felix Tatom 16 Tn.  Next to George Tatom 25 Tn;  wife Sarah 22 Ark; Georgia Ann Tatom 2 Ark, and Nancy Tatom 2/12 Ark.

 

Children of William Tatom ~~1790 to 1844) and Elizabeth Richardson:

Son of John Tatom (~1758 to 1824) and grandson of Stephen Tatom “I” (~1721 to 1789).

 

(a) Felix G. Tatom (12 Dec. 1834 to 22 November 1912 Hunt Co. Tx.) - son of William Tatom (~1790 to 1844), married Nannie E. Braley on 19 Dec. 1884

(b) Marian Rose Tatom (2 March 1833 to 26 April 1877 Hunt Co. Tx ) - son of William Tatom (~1790 to 1844),  married 1st on 20 May 1861 Johnson County, Arkansas to Sarah Elizabeth Fritz; 2nd to Sarah Jane Pinnell

(c) William Richardson Tatom - son of William Tatom (~1790 to 1844)

(d) Alford C. Tatom (16 August 1827 to >October 1888 Josephine, Oregon) – single, son of William Tatom (~1790 to 1844)

(e) James S. Tatom (>June 1820 to >April 1853 Johnson County) - son of William Tatom (~1790 to 1844) married Elizabeth L. __.

(f) Thomas Tatom (~1822 to 02 November 1846 San Antonio Texas) died in service with Mtd. Reg’t Arkansas infantry

(g) George W. Tatom (27 June 1825 to 19 October 1880 Hunt county, Texas) married Sarah Logan (29 January 1828 Arkansas to 25 September 1895 Hunt County).   In Johnson County, Arkansas 1850 and Hunt County Texas in 1860.

(h). Frances Ann Tatom (27 March 1826 to 14 March 1877)– daughter of William Tatom ~~1790 to 1844).   (Information from Gary Tharp, email December 2013 and website named above).

(i) Winniford Rebecca Tatom (9 March 1831 to 15 June 1899 Miller County, Arkansas or Cass County, Texas) - daughter William Tatom (~1790 to 1844), married 1st on 14 Feb. 1850 Johnson Co. Ark. to Edward D. Curtis; 2nd Wiley P. Murphy; and 3rd  on 22 December 1874 Cass County, Texas to Joseph Barber.

 

Continued – Children of John Tatum (~1758-1824) + Mary Wright

Grandchildren of Stephen Tatom “I” (~1721 to 1789).  

 

(ix). Steven Tatom born 27 November 1797 - son of John Tatom (~1758 to 1824):   

 

~1810 Hickman County, Tennessee: Steven Tatum is a witness, p.B9.

Reconstructed 1810 Census of Tennessee, Charles A. Sherrill, 2001; his source Hickman County Deed Book A (1808-1811) and B (1811-1813, typescript 1937 Works Progress Administration Collection at TSLA, Nashville.

1820 US Census of Dickson County, Tennessee: 1 male and 1 female 16-25

1826 May 16 – Dickson County: Stephen Tatom – Land Warrant #315 for 50 acres on West Fork Pine River.

1830 US Census of Dickson County: 1 male and 1 female 0-4, 1 male and 1 female 5-9, 1 male 10-14, 1 male 15-19, 1 male and 1 female 30-39

1841 Fayette County, Tennessee: Stephen Tatum is in Will Book A/72, not seen.

 

(x). Richard Tatom (22 August 1799 Georgia to >1860) - son of John Tatom (~1758 to 1824):

 

1830 US Census of Dickson County: Richard Tatum, 1 male and 2 females 0-5, 1 male and 1 female 5-9, 1 male 10-14, 1 female 20-29, 1 male 30-39

1840 US Census of Fayette County, Tennessee: Richard Tatum: 1 male and 1 female 0-4, 1 male 5-9, 1 male and 1 female 10-14, 1 male and 2 females 15-19, 1 male and female 40-49

1850 US Census of Fayette County, Tennessee: Richard Tatom 51 Georgia, Elizabeth Tatum 47 Georgia, Stephen R. Tatum 21 Tn, William W. Tatum 18 Tn, James M. Tatum 15 Tn, Sarah E. Tatum 12 Tn, Mary A. Tatum 11 Tn, Richard H. Tatum 9 TN, Nancy L. Tatum 5.

1860 US Census of La Grange, Lafayette County, Arkansas, P.O. Lewisville: Richard Tatom 60 Georgia, Elizabeth Tatom 57 Georgia, Jas. M. Tatom 24 Tn, Richard H. Tatom 17 Tn, Nancy L. Tatom 15 Tn.

 

(ix). George Washington Tatom (22 October 1802 to August 1879 and buried at Milan Cemetery ,Centerville, Hickman County, Tennessee) - son of John Tatom (~1758 to 1824).   He married Parthenia Murrell (1807 to 1902 and buried same cemetery).     

 

1827 August 30 – Dickson County: Land Warrant to James Richard and George Tatom, 100 acres on Pine River, “a little west of Richard and George Tatom’s west boundary line.   Has later land warrants”.

1830 US Census of Dickson County: George Tatom – 2 females 5-10, 1 male and 2 females 10-15, 1 male and female 20-30

1831 Dickson County tax: George W. Tatom, 80 acres.

1840 US Census of Dickson County: George W. Tatom – 1 male and 2 females 0-4, 1 male and 2 female 5-9, 2 females 10-14, 1 male 20-29, 1 female 20-29, 1 male 30-39, 1 male 50-59.

1850 US Census of Hickman County, Tn: George W. Tatum 45 Ga, Parthenia Tatum 43 Tn, Susan Tatum 18 Tn, Thomas Tatum 17 Tn, Sarah Tatum 15 Tn, Emily Tatum 13 Tn, Sublett Tatum 11 Tn (male), Richard Tatum 5 Tn, Aramintha Tatum 9 Tn, George Tatum 7 Tn, Martha Tatum 2 Tn.

 

Continued – Children of Stephen Tatum “I” (~1721 to 1789) and Morning Tatom, per will.

 

(10). William Tatom - son of Stephen and Morning Tatom, was born 11 January 1760 Spotsylvania County, Virginia (date a Bible record and date with location swore testimony) and died 24 September 1847 Dickson County, Tennessee, as documented per Revolution Pension application.  William Tatom married 27 October 1813 Dickson County (not a county record) to Mary Wright (born ~1765 per pension application).  It is not known if William had an earlier marriage.    Note that both William Tatom and his brother John Tatom have a son Richard Tatom who could be confused.  

 

1784 Granville County Tax, included John Tatom, John Tatom, Jr, William Tatom

1786 North Carolina State Census of Granville County, Dutch District:  William Tatom, William Tatom, 1 male over 21, 1 male under 21, 2 females any age.  Also in Dutch District is John Tatom.

1788 Granville County, North Carolina tax: (1) Barnard Tatom, Tabb’s Creek District, 135 acres; (2) William Tatom, Reed’s District, 140 acres; (3). John Tatum, Dutch District, 80 acres.

Colonial and State Records of North Carolina, Volume 5, page 1270.

1800 US Census of Orange County, North Carolina: William Tatum 2 males and 1 female 0-10, 1 male and 1 female 10-16, 1 male 16-26, 1 male and 1 female 26-45.  Next to Keziah Tatum.

1806 and 1811 – Franklin County, Georgia tax: William Tatom.

~1812 Dickson County: “Soldiers furnished by Dickson County to the War of 1812” (includes) William Tatom.

History of Tennessee – From the Earliest Time to the Present, 1886.

1813 October 27 - Dickson County:  Mary Wright in her widow’s pension application stated she had married William Tatom on this date.   Dickson County marriage records for this era have been lost. 

1820 US Census of Dickson County: William Tatum, Sr., 2 males and 2 females 0-10, 2 males and 1 female 10-16, 1 male and 1 female 26-45, 1 male 45+.  Two entries away from William Tatum, Jr.

1824 November 7 – Dickson County: William Tatom - Land Warrant #326 for 67 acres on both sides of Upper East Fork of Yellow River.

1830 US Census of Dickson County: William Tatum, Sr. 1 male and 1 female 5-10, 1 male and 1 female 1-15, 1 female 40-50, 1 male 60-70.

1832 October 8 – Dickson County, Tennessee:  (Summary) American Revolutionary Soldier pension application of William Tatom, swears he was born in Spotsylvania County, Virginia on 11 January 1760.  Date was from his father’s Bible.  He resided in Spotsylvania until about the commencement of the Revolutionary War, when he moved to Orange County, North Carolina, then to Dickson County, Tennessee about 1807.    He first enlisted in Orange County in 1778 or 1779 and served two tours of 3 months for at least a total of seven and a half months service, spent mostly in the Orange and Hillsborough and adjoining counties guarding the settlements from Tories who were at that time very bad and that his older (or elder) brother John was with him.   His last tour of duty was at Hillsboro where he and his brother John served five or six week or more making shoes for the soldiers.   He does not recall the names of his officers.

1840 US Census of Dickson County: William Tatom, 1 male 10-15, 3 males and 1 female 15-20, 1 female 20-30, 1 female 60-70, 1 male 80-90.  Found on same line – William Tatum, age 80, veteran.

1844 August 28 – Dickson County, Tennessee:  Will of William Tatom - To wife Mary all my land lying on the north side of Yellow Creek, the plantation where I now live….  To son Benjamin Marshal Tatom, the above after death of my wife.  To sons Thomas and Richard Tatom, all the land on the south side of Yellow Creek.  To Daughter Ann Shelby Tatem… To daughter Jennetta Tatom.  Wife Mary to be executrix.  28 August 1844.  Signed: William “x” Tatom.  Witnesses D. H. William, M.J. Byrn, Joel Rogers.  No date entered.

1850 US Census of Dickson County, Middle District:  Thos. R. Tatom 35 blacksmith, Tn, Margaret G. Tatom 21 Tn, Mary Tatom 80 NC, Jennett Tatom 29 Tn.

1853 July 5 - Humphreys County, Tennessee:  Mary Tatom’s 1853 widow pension application stated she married William Tatom on 27 October 1813 Dickson County, and she was living in Humphrey County, Tennessee.   On a different statement, Mary Tatom was 89 years old and a resident of Dickson County in 5 July 1853.   In 1855, she was age 90.    Her husband died 24 September 1847 in Dickson County, Tennessee.  No children were named in pension. *   The pension board doubted the marriage information and no such marriage could be found Dickson County Court house.  Several witnesses affirmed her marriage date in or about 27 October 1813, and a deposition stated the Dickson County Court House lost some marriage records from storm damage. **

 

1857 September 27 – Dickson County, Tennessee: Mary Tatom’s bounty land application on 27 September 1857, stated she was the widow of William Tatom, a private in the American Revolution.  He died at his residence in Dickson County.  Mary’s age was about 90.  Her name was “Mary Wright” before her marriage to William Tatom. **

* (F-W2270 R2343, BLV73589), Heritage Books Archives, Virginia/West Virginia Revolutionary War Records, Volumes 1-6, Patrick G. Wardell #1382 CD.

** US Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty Land Warrant Applications, Files 1800-1900, on ancestry.com

(uncertain) 1860 US Census of P.O. Danielsville, Dickson County: John Tatom 73 farmer, NC; Mary Tatom 94 NC; Mary Adcock 23 Tn, Mary Adcock 3 Tn.    John Tatom’s birth date here would be ~1787 and Mary Tatom’s ~1766.  Where was this John Tatom before this time?

 

Children of William Tatum, Senior (1760-1844), per 1844 will - (i) to (v):

Grandchildren of Stephen Tatom “I” (~1721 to 1789) and Morning Tatom,

 

(i). Benjamin Marshal Tatom (1815/16)  – son of William Tatum, Senior (1760-1844) married 27 April 1844 Dickson County to Sarah Dotson (county record).

 

1850 US Census of Middle District, Dickson County: Benj. Tatom 34 farmer, Tn; Sarah A. Tatom 25 Tn; William Tatom 5 Tn; Tabitha T. Tatom Tn 

 

(ii). Thomas R. Tatom (1814/15) – son of William Tatum, Senior (1760-1844).  Father’s 1744 will notes he is living.    Thomas R. Tatom married 9 August 1849 Dickson County to Martha Hudson (country record).  Note that the marriage and census records differ on Martha/Margaret.

 

1850 US Census of Dickson County, Middle District:  Thos. R. Tatom 35 blacksmith, Tn, Margaret G. Tatom 21 Tn; Mary Tatom 80 NC; Jennett Tatom 29 Tn.  (p148b)

 

(iii). Richard Tatom – son of William Tatum, Senior (1760-1844).  Father’s 1744 will notes he is living. 

(iv). Ann Shelby Tatom – daughter William Tatum, Senior (1760-1844)

(v). Jennetta Tatom - – daughter of William Tatum, Senior (1760-1844).  See 1850 Census above for Jennett Tatom.

 

Continued – Children of  __ Tatom (born ca1680/90)

 

(III). Hanney Tatom, daughter of ??? Tatom (born ca1680/90 and died __).   Married a Graves.

(IV). Jemima Tatom, daughter of ??? Tatom (born ca1680/90 and died __).   Married a Carrington

(V). Sarah Tatom, daughter of ??? Tatom (born ca1680/90 and died __).   Married a Chandler

(VI). Susanna Tatom, daughter of ??? Tatom (born ca1680/90 and died __).  (died ~1794).  Married a Fullilove.  See her will above.

 

(VII). Benjamin Tatom (~1730 to 1812/13 Lunenburg County, Va), son of ??? Tatom (born ca1680/90 and died __.).   Benjamin Tatom married Mary Gravit or Gravitt.  Used the Tatum spelling. 

 

1752 to 1776 - Lunenburg County, Virginia tithes: Benjamin Tatum/Tatom.  In 1752, he appears under the name of Peter Fontaine.  He is near a Charles Gravitt.  Under his name beginning in 1769 appear at least once are: Reubin Tatum, Joseph Tatum, William Tatum

1757 December 15 – Lunenburg County Land Grant: Benjamin Tatum with 400 acres on the branches of the middle and north forks of Maherrin adjoining Williams and Brown’s lines.

Virginia Land Office Grants, online at Library of Virginia.

1768 March 10 – Cumberland Parish Vestry, Lunenburg County:  Returns of Processioners included Benjamin Tatom in presence of Anthony Fullilove and Zodock Ward.

Cumberland Parish Vestry, Lunenburg County, Virginia 1746-1816, by Landon C. Bell, 1930.

1772 March 24 – Cumberland Parish Vestry, Lunenburg County: Returns of Processioners, Benjamin Tatom and nearby is Anthony Fullilove and William Fullilove.

Cumberland Parish Vestry, Lunenburg County, Virginia 1746-1816, by Landon C. Bell, 1930.

1782 Virginia Census – Lunenburg County: Benjamin Tatum 2-3, Joseph Tatum 1-0, Reuben Tatum 1-1, William Tatum 0-0.  1st number is white polls, 2nd is slaves.

(possibly) 1787 to 1788 – Dinwiddie County, Virginia: Benjamin Tatum is taxed on 186 acres.

Land Records – Dinwiddie County, Virginia 1752 – 1820, by Thomas P. Hughes, Jr. and Jewel B. Standefer, undated.

1810 US Census of Charlotte County: Benjamin Tatum 1 male 10-16, 1 male 16-26, 1 male and 1 female 45+, 9 slaves.

 

~1813-1815 Charlotte County Chancery Case 1815-027 – Mary Tatum, Widow of Benjamin Tatum, etc versus Meriwether Hurt, administrator of Benjamin Tatum.   (From Library of Virginia on-line Chancery Cases)

 

Apparently one or more living descendants were left out of his estate division; i.e. Crafton Tatum, son of Reubin.  The original documents have run-together sentences, lack of commas, etc. making the document confusing and subject to different interpretations.  A few changes have been made here, hopefully, to improve content.  The relationships are repeated for clarification several times from different Chancery documents.      

 

(Page Two) To the wonderful County Court of Charlotte in Chancery, sitting, humbly complaining shew to the Court of your orator and oratrix Mary Tatum, Gravit Tatum, John Tatum, Benjamin G. Tatum, Jas. Robertson and Charity his wife formerly Charity Tatum, John Haley and Susanna his wife formerly Susanna Tatum, Thomas Stokes and Wealthy his wife formerly Wealthy Tatum.  That Benjamin Tatum the elder lately died interstate, late seized and possessed of a tract of land in this county wherein was his mansion house, lot in this county __ of his devise and seized and possessed also of other lands lying in the county of Lunenburg and possessed of slaves, stocks and other personal property both in the county, in the said county of Lunenburg that the administrator of the goods and chattels of the said intestate heirs by this worshipful court been under inform(ed?) of __, committed to Merriweather Hurt that your admin(istrator).  Mary Tatum is the widow and __ of the said intestate and his heirs and administrator are your orators, Gravit Tatum, John Tatum, Benjamin G. Tatum, who are sons of said intestate, and your oratress Charity Robertson, Susanna Haley, Wealthy Stokes, Lucy Tatum, Oriana Fullylove – wife of William Fullylove, and Mary Lafoe – wife of Daniel Lafoe who are daughters of the said inters. (page ends here)

(page 3) “Tab/” Crafton Tatum, Nancy Tatum, Lucy Tatum, Berryman Tatum, Sally Tatum and Polly Tatum who are grandchildren of the said intestate being children of Reubin Tatum, dec’d who was a son of the said intestate, Tab/ Betsy Lister or Lester – wife of Josiah Lester great grandson of said intestate being the son of Elizabeth Lester (or Lister) who was the daughter of the said Reuben who was the son of __ intestate. 

Charity Tatum, Benj Tatum, Abner Tatem, Washington Tatum, David Tatum, John Tatum, William Tatum, and Sarah Tatum – children of Joseph Tatum, dec’d who was a son of the intestate.

Absalom Tatum, Matthew Tatum, Susanna L. Tatum, Charity Tatum, Polly Tatum, Eliza Tatum, and Nancy Tatum who are children of William Tatum dec’d who was a son of the said intestate.

Gravit Lewis, Benjamin Lewis, Patsy Lewis, Polly Lewis, Rhoda Lewis, and Sarah M. Lewis who are children of Sarah Lewis dec’d who was a daughter of said intestate. 

That your orator and oratress understand that the said intestate in his life has made considerable advancements to his aforesaid daughter Orsana Fullylove and Mary Lafoe as to their aforesaid has lands after their marriage and that the four last mentioned parties are absent for this state. 

That the said has(?) personal estate is in such a posture as to...(and so on)…want a different division of the said estate…to answer all living the allegations have of what the said Josiah Lister, David Tatum, Allen Tatum, Benj. Tatum, Matthew Tatum, Polly Tatum, Eliza Tatum, Nancy Tatum, Benj Lewis, Gravit Lewis, Polly Lewis, Rhoda Lewis, __ Lewis who are infants answer by their guardian and __ friend, Meriwether Hunt…(and so on)…. (undated, possibly 1814).

(Page 7)  Answer of appointed by the court to answer on behalf of Josiah Lister (or Lester with an “i” which has no dot) infant son of Betsy Lister.  And David Tatem, infant son of Joseph Tatem dec’d.  Allen Tatum, Benjamin Tatum, Matthew Tatum, Polly Tatum, Eliza Tatum and Nancy Tatum infant children of William Tatum, dec’d.   And Benjamin Lewis, Grant Lewis, Polly Lewis, Rhoda Lewis, and Sarah M. Lewis infant children of Sarah Lewis, dec’d to the Bill of Complaint exhibited against him in the County Court of Charlotte by Mary Tatum – widow of Benj. Tatum, dec’d, Gravit Tatum, Benja. G. Tatum….(and so on).

(Page 9)  Charlotte Court, dated 2nd (?) March 1813:  Case of Mary Tatum, widow of Benjamin Tatum, dec’d and other named Tatums versus Meriwether Hunt, Administrator of Benjamin Tatum, dec’d.  Relationships continue:

Lucy Tatum, William Fullylove – Orina Fullylove his wife, Daniel Lafoe – Mary Lafoe his wife, daughters of the said Intestate Benjamin Tatum.

Crafton Tatum, Nancy Tatum, Lucy Tatum, Benjamin Tatum, Sally Tatum, and Polly Tatum – children of Reuben Tatum who was the son of the said intestate and grand children of the said Benjamin Tatum. 

Joniah Lester great grandson of the said intestate being the son of Elizabeth Lester who was the daughter of the said Reubin who was the son of the intestate.

Charles Tatum, Benjamin Tatum, Abner Tatum, Washington Tatum, David Tatum, John Tatum, William Tatum, and Sarah Tatum children of Joseph Tatum dec’d who was a son of the said intestate.

Absolum Tatum, William Tatum, Allen Tatum, Benjamin Tatum, Matthew Tatum, Susannah Tatum, Charity Tatum, Polly Tatum, Elizabeth Tatum and Nancy Tatum who are the children of William Tatum, dec’d who was a son of the said intestate.

Gravet Lewis, Benjamin Lewis, Patsey Lewis, Polly Lewis and Sarah M. Lewis who are the children of Sarah Lewis, dec’d who was a daughter of the said Intestate…..

(Page 10)  Said William Fullylove and Oriana his wife, Daniel Lafoe and Mary his wife not have entered their appearance according to the Act of Assembly and the rules of this Court.  And is appearing to the satisfaction of the Court that they are NOT inhabitants of this State, on motion of the plaintiffs by their attorney, it is ordered that they appear here on the 1st day of June Court….(dated) 5 April 1813.  

 

A survey and division of estate lands were done by John Knight dated 13 August 1813: (1) 671 acres lying in Charlotte County on both sides of Kings Road, and subdivided into lots 11 through 13, (2) 539 ¾ acres (in Lunenberg County), known as “Beasley’s Old Tract” on Spring Field Creek where it empties into the (North) Meherrin River on the north side, lying with More’s Road and assigned to dower Mary Tatum, (3). 570 acres in Lunenburg County on each side of Double Bridge Road and one point on Hurricane Creek and just below Nance’s Tavern and subdivided in lots 1 through 6, (4). 426 ¾ acres (in Lunenburg County) known by the name of Gregory’s Old Tract, lying on the waters of N. Meherrin, and divided into lots 7 through 10.   Double Bridges, Hurricane Creek, Spring Creek can be found in Delorme “Virginia Atlas and Gazetteer.”

 

Division to descendants was: (1) Lucy Tatum lot #1 + (slave) boy Ben, (2) Reubin Tatum’s children, lot #2 + (slave) boys Nelson, Young, Jeremy, (3) John Haley, #3 + (slave) fellow Ceasar, woman Denalis, (4) James Robertson #4 + (slave) girl Delila, boy George, (5). Thomas Stokes #5 + (slave) woman Nanny & child Eliz., girl Diley, (6) Gravit Tatum #6 + boy Webb, girl Harriott, (7) William Fullilove #7 + girl Betty, Lucy, (8) Joseph Tatum’s children #8 + girl Mary, boy Jordan, (9) William Tatum’s children #9 + woman Hannah & child Naley, girl Cloe, (10) Daniel Lefoe #10 + woman Fanny and John, (11). Elam Lewis’ children, #11 + girls Writter, Indy, (12). John Tatum #12 + girl Lucky, boy Frank, girl Winny, (13) Benjamin G. Tatum #13 + Cindy & child Cesar.    Mary Tatum, wife and widow of Benjamin Tatum, dec’d  received 539 ¾ acres on both sides of Mores (Moores) Road near the Double Bridges; also negroes Lucy, Washington, Borrell and Unicy.  Dated 2 July 1814.   

 

Children of Benjamin Tatom/Tatum (~1730 to 1812/13) and Mary Gravit include:

Noted 1 - 13 as sons and daughters in the 1813/15 Charlotte County Chancery Case.

 

(1). Reubin Tatom/Tatum (~1751/53 to before 1813), son of Benjamin Tatom (~1730 to 1812/13).  Appears on Lunenburg tax 1769, 1772, 1773, 1774 and under Benjamin Tatom’s name in 1769.   If Reubin was 16-18 in 1769, then his birth date could be estimated ~1751 to 1753.   Age 16 is the earliest age a white male could appear on the tax records.  Reubin Tatom married Ann Crafton about before 1777.

 

1777 September 4 – Lunenburg County, Virginia: Will of James Crafton. Mentions wife Kenenhappitch Crafton.  Sons are William Crafton, Richard Crafton, John Crafton, Anthony Crafton, Thomas Crafton, James Crafton, Joseph Crafton.  Daughters are Ann Tatum, Elizabeth Robertson.  Executors are Kenenhappitch Crafton (wife) and John Crafton (son).  Witnesses: Anthony Fullilove and John (x) Arven.  (Entered 13 May 1779.  (WB3/18).

Lunenberg County, Virginia Wills 1746-1825, by Landon C. Bell 1972, #117

 

            The name “Kenenhappitch” is reported to be a biblical name and not an Indian name.

 

1782 State Census of Virginia – Lunenberg County: Reubin Tatum 1 white tax, 1 black.

1810 US Census of Charlotte County, Virginia: Reuben Tatum 2 males and 2 females 0-10, 1 male and 1 female 10-15, 1 male and female 20-44, 1 female 45+, 1 slave.

 

Children of Reubin Tatum and Ann Crafton:

* Children’s names listed living in 1813/15 Charlotte County Chancery Case 1815-027

 

(i). Nancy Tatum,* daughter of Reubin Tatum (~1751/53 to before 1813)

(ii). Lucy Tatum,* “daughter of Reubin Tatum” has a marriage bond 26 December 1804 Charlotte County, Virginia to William Jones, Surety - Cadwallender Jones.  Married 27 December by Rev. Richard Dobbs, Jr. p. 354.

Marriage Bonds and Minister’s Returns of Charlotte County, Virginia 1764-1815, by Catherine Lindsay Knorr, 1951.

(iii). Berryman Tatum,* son of Reubin Tatum (~1751/53 to <1813).  Berry Tatum has a 25 October 1815 Charlotte County marriage bond to Margaret Jones, daughter of Cadwallader Jones, Sr., and surety by David Jones (county record).

(iv). Sally Tatum,* daughter of Reubin Tatum (~1751/53 to <1813),  Sallie Tatum, daughter of Reuben Tatum has a 15 January 1815 Charlotte County marriage bond to Cadwallader Jones, Jr., with surety by Cadwallader Jones, Sr. (county record).

(v). Polly Tatum,* daughter of Reubin Tatum (~1751/53 to <1813).

(vi). Elizabeth Tatum married __ Lester “who was the daughter of … Reubin (Tatum)” who was son of Intestate (Benjamin Tatum), according to 1813-1815 Charlotte County Chancery Case.  Had a son Joniah Lester living during the Chancery.

 

(vii). Crafton Tatum* (~1775 to October 1850 in Lawrence County, Indiana), son of Reubin Tatum (~1751/53 to <1813), married 1 January 1794 Lunenburg County, Virginia to Susannah Fullilove (county record).

 

Details for Crafton Tatum (~1775 to 1850)

 Son of Reubin Tatum (~1751/53 to <1813)

 

1797 and 1799 Madison County, Kentucky Tax Lists: Crafton Tatom.  In 1799 tax, next to Samuel Tatom, who reportedly died in Madison County in 1805.   Who is Samuel Tatom?

1797 November - Madison County, Kentucky Court Order books show a “Crafting Tatom” and “William Fullilove” approved a deed of gift from Henry Burnnam, Sr to John Burnnan.  1812: Crafton Tatum served in the War of 1812.  He was a Private in 17 Reg’t (Francesco’s) Kentucky Militia.

1810 US Census of Madison County, Kentucky: Crafton Tatum, 2 males and 3 females 0-10, 1 female 10-16, 1 male and 1 female 26-45. 1 slave.

1813-1815 Charlotte County, Virginia Chancery Case: Not living in State of Virginia at this time.

1830 US Census of Madison County – western division, Kentucky: Crafton Tatum 1 female 5-9, 1 male and 1 female 10-14, 1 male 20-29, 1 male and 1 female 50-59, 1 slave

1850 October 20 – Lawrence County, Indiana:  Will of Craften Tatum of Lawrence County, Indiana:

…To my daughter Elizabeth Matdox the land on which I live, being 40 acres

…to Mary Matdox (relationship not written) one cow and calf

…to my daughter Oraney Turner one dollar

…to my daughter Rebecca Fullerlove, one dollar

…to my son William Tatum, one dollar

…to my daughter Susannah Hamilton one dollar.

…to heirs of Lucy Dixon, Matilda Flinn, America Flinn, Gravet Tatum….

Friend and Neighbor Nathaniel William to be Executor, probated 21 November 1850.

 

Children of Crafton Tatum + Susanna Fullilove (a), (b), (c), etc.

Grandchildren of Reubin Tatum (~1751/53 to <1813)

* From his will and 1814 Charlotte County Court Case

 

(a). Elizabeth Tatum* who married __ Matdox

(b). Orania or Orana Tatum* (died 3 October 1872 Lawrence County, Indiana) married 1 December 1825 Madison County, Kentucky to Ruben Turner (~1804 to 11 March 1874 Lawrence County, Indiana (marriage date is county record)

Tracing Turn, Quarterly Newsletter, Vol/Pg not noted, but on Google Books

(c). Rebecca Tatum* who married __ Fullilove

(d). William Tatum*

(e). Susannah Tatum* who married __ Hamilton

(f). (possibly) Lucy Tatum married 1 August 1818 Madison County, Kentucky to Thomas Dixon (county record).  She is mentioned in Crafton’s will but the relationship is not defined. 

  

(2). Joseph Tatum/Tatom (~1754/56 to before 1813/1815 Chancery Case), son of Benjamin Tatom (~1730 to 1812/13).    Appears on Lunenburg tax 1772, 1773, 1774, 1776, 1783 and under Benjamin Tatom/Tatum’s name in 1772, 1774.   If age 16 to 18 in 1772, his birth date might be estimated to be 1754 to 1756. 

 

Children of Joseph Tatum per 1814 Charlotte County Chancery Case (*): (i) – (viii)

 

(i). Charity Tatum* or once stated in 1813-1815 Chancery case as Charles Tatum.

(ii). Benjamin Tatum*

(iii). Abner Tatum* (born 1781/1787 per conflicting census records to >1860+) married 2 December 1813 Halifax County, Virginia to “Caty Rogers.”   They are hard to trace, but have their final years in Limestone County, Alabama.   

 

1850 US Census of Division 3, Limestone County, Alabama: Abner Tatum 69 Va, Catherine Tatum 68 NJ.

 

1860 US Census of Division 1, Limestone County, P.O. Shoalford. Alabama: John Wales 49 famer, Ind, Elizabeth Wales 45 Va., John W. Tatom 15 Al, \next page\ Jamie A. Tatom 12 Ala, Abner Tatom 73 Va., Catherine Tatom 73 Ky.  (image 12 & 13 ancestry.com) Whole census very hard to  read; “T” in Tatom is questionable.

 

(iv). Washington Tatum* married 28 December 1816 Charlotte County to Sarah Tatum (county record).

(v). David Tatum* was named a minor in the 1813/15 Chancery case.

(vi). John Tatum *

(vii). William Tatum*

(viii). Sarah Tatum*

 

(3). William Tatum/Tatom (~1758/60 to 1811), son of Benjamin Tatom (~1730 to 1812/13).    Appears on Lunenburg tax 1776 and 1783 under Benjamin Tatum’s name.  If age 16 to 18 in 1776, his birth date could be estimated to be ~1758/60.  William Tatum married 11 March 1784 Lunenburg County by Thomas Crymes to Mary Renshaw (county record).  William Tatum has so many children that the Tatum-Renshaw marriage could be his second marriage.

 

Details for William Tatum (~1758/60 to 1811)

 

1810 US Census of Lunenburg County, Virginia: William Tatum with 1 male and 2 females 0-10, 2 males and 1 female 10-16, 1 male 16-26, 1 female 26-45, 1 male 45+, 4 slaves

1811 March 30 – Lunenburg County, Virginia: Will of William Tatum mentions wife Mary Tatum, sons being Abraham Tatum, William Tatum, Allen Tatum, Benjamin Tatum, Matthew Tatum.  Daughters mentioned are Nannie Tatum, Suckey Wood, Charity Tatum, Elizabeth Tatum, Nancy Tatum, Polly Tatum.  Executors: Mary Tatum (wife), Abraham Tatum (son).  Witnesses: Clement R. Jameson, James Robertson, Martin Pearce. Entered 10 October 1811.  (WB7/26)

 Lunenburg County, Virginia Wills 1746-1825, by Landon C. Bell, 1972. #476

1817 June 12 – Lunenburg County, Virginia:  Will of Mary Tatum mentions Grandson Coleman B. Munday.  Executor was John Tatum.  Witnesses were Merewether Hurt, John Crafton, Joshua Staples.  Entered 3 January 1818.  (WB7/346)

Lunenburg County, Virginia Wills 1746-1825, by Landon C. Bell, 1972.

 

Children of William Tatum (~1758/60 to 1811) + Mary Renshaw

* Children named and living per 1814 Charlotte County Chancery Case

 

(i). Absalom Tatum (Abraham Tatum).*  “Absolam Tatum married 12 July 1813 Lunenburg County to Sally Green, surety being Richard Bragg (county and minister records).

(ii). William Tatum*

(iii). Allen Tatum*

(iv) Benjamin Tatum*; on 1810 US Census of Lunenburg County, Va.

(v) Matthew Tatum*

(vi). Susanna L. Tatum* or possibly “Suckey” or Sukey Tatum, married a Wood, per her father’s 1811 will.   Susanna Tatum married 29 December 1802 Lunenburg County to Christopher Wood, by James Shelburne (WB 6/28)

(vii). Charity Tatum*

(vii). Elizabeth Tatum*

(ix). Nancy (Nannie) Tatum* 

(x). Polly Tatum.*

 

(4). Benjamin G. Tatum* (~1775 to 1831*) was the “son of Benjamin Tatum” (~1730 to 1812/13) and was named in the 1813/15 Charlotte County Chancery Case of his father.   Benjamin G. Tatum has an 1832 Charlotte County Chancery Court estate administration which names “Polly” his widow, and their two living children, and estate administrators – “Bosell Tatum” and “Walker D. Keeling.”  The 1832 administration stated Benjamin G. Tatum, deceased had 215 acres in Charlotte County lying on Reeses Fork of Twitty Creek and Martin’s Road.  When the estate administrators failed to name Polly as a dower, this caused the Chancery case.   The court then assigned Polly 77 ½ acres and the mansion house to her. 

 

1810 US Census of Lunenburg County, Virginia: Benjamin G. Tatum 1 male + 1 female 0-10, 1 male + 1 female 26-45, 11 slaves

1820 US Census of Charlotte County: Benjamin G. Tatum 1 male and 1 female 16-26, 1 male 26-45, 6 slaves

1830 US Census of Charlotte County: Benjamin G. Tatum 1 male 20-30, 1 female 40-50, 1 male 50-60

 

Children of Benjamin G. Tatum (~1775 to 1831) and wife Polly:

 

(i). Bossell or Boswell G. Tatum married 16 may 1835 Charlotte County to Joyce A. Bradberry (county record).  Both Boswell and Weltha were of legal age during the 1832 Chancery Case.

(ii) Weltha F. Tatum who married Walker D. Keeling* Charlotte County on 15 December 1823 (county record).

 

(5). John Tatum*, was the “son of Benjamin Tatum” (~1730 to 1813) and was living during the 1813/15 Charlotte County Chancery Case, which is his last known record.  More details for him and his family need to be found.

 

(Probably) 1810 US Census of Lunenburg County, Va: John Tatum 2 males and 2 females 0-10, 1 male 10-16, 1 male and 1 females 26-45, 2 slaves.

 

(6). Mary Tatum*, daughter of Benjamin Tatom (~1730 to 1812/13), married Daniel Lefoe and was a “daughter of Benjamin Tatum” (~1730 to 1812/13) and was living during the 1813/15 Charlotte County Chancery Case.   “Molly Tatum” has a 10 February 1791 Lunenburg County marriage bond to Daniel Lefoe with surety by Gravitt Tatum (county record).

(Marriages of Lunenburg County, Virginia 1746-1853 by Emma R. Matheny and Helen K. Yates, 1990.)

   

(7). Susanna Tatum*, daughter of Benjamin Tatom (~1730 to 1812/13), married on 11 March 1784 Lunenburg County, Virginia to “John Hailey” or more correctly “Haley” (county record).  She and her husband were living during the 1813/15 Charlotte County Chancery Case.  

 

(8). Orena, Orana, Orinia or Orina Tatum, daughter of Benjamin Tatom (~1730 to 1812/13), married William O. Fullilove (~1753 to 1815 Madison County, Kentucky).   Orina was the “daughter of Benjamin Tatum” (ca 1725 to 1813) and living during the 1813/15 Charlotte County Chancery Case.   They were living in Madison County, Kentucky during time of 1813/15 Chancery Case.

 

(9). Lucy Tatum*, “daughter of Benjamin Tatum” (ca1725 to 1813) was living during the 1813/15 Charlotte County Chancery Case, and was not married at this time.

 

(10). Charity Tatum*, daughter of Benjamin Tatom (~1730 to 1812/13), married 21 January 1795 Lunenburg County to James Robertson, surety bond by Frederick Nance and married by James Shelburne (county and minister records).  Charity Tatum, wife of James Robertson is named in 1813-1815 Charlotte County Chancery Case as a daughter of Benjamin Tatum, (Sr.) deceased.

Marriage Bonds and Minister’s Returns of Charlotte County, Virginia 1764-1815, by Catherine Linday Knorr, 1951  

 

(11). Wealthy Tatum.*, daughter of Benjamin Tatom (~1730 to 1812/13).   The following may belong here: Wealthy Tatum married 18 December 1793 Lunenburg County to John Monday (Munday), by James Shelburne (Minister’s record).  The 1813-1815 Charlotte County Chancery Case lists Wealthy Tatum as the wife of Thomas Stokes.  There is an interesting Lunenburg County marriage bond between Boling Crowder and Polly Munday, daughter of John Munday, dec’d, 31 March 1813, with surety by Thomas Stokes.  This marriage took place 1 April 1813 by James Robertson (county and ministers records)

(WB 4/46, Marriages of Lunenburg County, Virginia 1746-1853 by Emma R. Matheny and Helen K. Yates, 1990.  

 

(12). Sarah Lewis, daughter of Benjamin Tatom (~1730 to 1812/13), has a 21 February 1791 Lunenburg County marriage bond to Elam Lewis with surety by Gravitt Tatum and married by James Shelburne (county and minister records).  Sarah was deceased in 1813-1815 Charlotte County Chancery Case with her children being named: Gravit Lewis, Benjamin Lewis, Patsy Lewis, Polly Lewis, Rhoda Lewis, and Sarah M. Lewis.    

 

(13). Gravit Tatum* (~1770 to June 1826 or 1827*) was the “son of Benjamin Tatum” (~1730 to 1813) and was named during the 1813/15 Charlotte County Chancery Case.  During 1827-1832, his widow Nancy Tatum filed a Charlotte County Chancery Case against her deceased husband’s Administrator who was her son Benjamin S. Tatum.   Problem was how to handle the estate division for the infant children (stated less than age 21) and manage a complex debt.  When Gravit Tatum died, he had 654 acres of land on King’s Road in Charlotte County and slaves Anthony, Patrick, Maria, Webb, Dennis, Lish, Harriet, Easter, Washington, and possibly more.   Of the 654 acres, Nancy Tatum received 220 acres, 220 acres were sold to George W. Tathum (Tatum) and another 220 acres sold to John F. Drinkard.   

 

1791 January 12 – Lunenburg County:  (not understood, perhaps wording is confused) Guardian Account for Gravett Tatom, rec of Henry Haley, gdn of said Tatom’s wife Nancy.  Pounds 55.14.1 as her division of estate of John Roberts, deceased.  Witness – Benjamin Tatom.  Signature Gravett Tatom.  Recorded 11 October 1792.

Lunenburg County, Virginia Guardian Accounts 1791-1810,  by June Banks Evans, 1995.

1810 US Census of Charlotte County, Virginia: Gravit Tatum 1 male and 1 female 0-10, 1 female 10-16, 1 female 16-26, 1 male and 1 female 26-45, 8 slaves

1820 US Census of Charlotte County, Virginia: Gravit Tatum 2 males 0-10, 1 male 16-26, 1 female 10-16, 1 male and 1 female 45+, 14 slaves

1830 US Census of Charlotte County: Nancy Tatum - 1 male 10-14, 1 female 50-59, 3 slaves.

 

Children of Gravit Tatum (~1770 to 1826/27) and wife Nancy

* As noted in the Chancery Case (1832-051 Lib. Va) with husband’s names were:

 

(i). Nancy A. Tatum married with John F. Drinkard* as spelled.    Nancy A. Tatum married 12 November 1827 Charlotte County to John F. Dunkard (county record). 

(ii). Benjamin S. Tatum

(iii). Sarah B. Tatum married George W. Tatum or Tathum.*   His origins are not understood.

(iv). Mary M. (Polly) Tatum married Henry W. Stokes.*   Polly Tatum, daughter of “Garnett Tatum” has a 26 August 1815 Charlotte County, Virginia marriage bond to Henry Stokes.  Married 30 August 1815 by Rev. James Robertson (county and minister records)

(v). Charlotte C. Tatum married Woodson Almond*

(vi). Wiley G. Tatum was a minor when his father died,* and married 29 December 1831 in Charlotte County, Virginia to Amy S. Cheaney. 

(vii). Abel I. G. Tatum was a minor during the Chancery case.*    

 

Part III - Miscellaneous Information with Tatoms or Tatums:

 

(1). Tatom/Tatums Who Can’t Be Placed

 

1 - John Tatum/Tatom (died 1725 + will) of Northampton County, Virginia

 

Information is newly found (10/2014) and incomplete.   Northampton scribes spell the surname phonetically as Tatom, Tatum, Tatem, Tatam, or Tatham.   Keep in mind that poor handwriting and faded records complicate spelling interpretations.   “Tatom” in 1720-1769 Northampton tithables was used slightly more than “Tatum”; other spellings much less.    John Tatum’s 1664 record doesn’t tell us if he is indentured servant, hired hand, or renter of land from Colonel John Stringer.  One of his children is named Bowker Tatum.  Another – Thomas Tatum is strongly associated with the Nottinghams in the tax records.  Both should be workable clues.    

 

In later years – 1750 or 60’s, it is possible Accomack County descendants of the immigrant - Edmund Tatham (died 1723 Accomack County. Va.) migrated to Northampton.  This could explain the sudden appearance of the Tatham spelling.   The 1787 Virginia State Census for Accomack County lists James Tatham, Sr. and Jr., John Tatham, and Mical (Michael) Tatham.  The Virginia State Census for 1782 Northampton County has a Richard Tatum.

 

1664 – Northampton County, Virginia Tithables:  Grouped together are Coll. Jno Stringer – 7 tithes; Jno Tatum, Tho Payne, Theophilus Boulton, Jno Hornsby, Tho: Oxford, Jno Bulle.  Col. John Stringer is not recorded on the 1662 tithables, but in 1663, he has 7 with no names.   The 1662-1677 lists spell the surname as “Tatum.”

Northampton County, Virginia Tithables 1662-1677, by John B. Bell, 2008.

1665 – Northampton County Tithables: Coll. John Stringer – 7; Mr. Baugh, John Tatum, Robert ?ilne; John Hornsby, Thomas Oxford, Richard Curtiss.

1666 August – Northampton County, Virginia Tithables: “Coll. John Stringer, John Tatum, Robert Chew, David Grim, Richard Curtisse, Thomas Oxford – 6 (tithes).”

1667 November 28 – Norfolk County: Entered into Court this date the cattlemark for John Tatum: his mark, cropt on the right ear and a slit on the outmost part of the right ear, and a hole in the left ear.

Northampton County, Virginia Cattlemarks 1665-1742, by Frank V. Waldczyk, online.

1667, 1668, 1671, 1675, 1676 - Northampton County tithables which survived: John Tatum is by himself or listed as the head with another person; i.e. 1667 – John Tatum - 2 tithes with Cornelius Berry; 1668 – John Tatum – 2 tithes with John Hornsby.  The next surviving tax record is 44 years later in 1720.  

1702 December 3 – Northampton County: John Tatum is a witness to the will of Thomas Duparkes, Northampton County.  Entered 1 May 1702/03.

Virginia County Records, Miscellaneous County Records, William Armstrong Crozier, pg. 146.

1704 (King’s) Virginia Quit Rents:  No Tatum (any spelling) listed as land owner in Northampton County, Virginia.  Edmund Tatham of adjacent Accomack County has 200 acres.  Renters were not included.

1708/09 March 7 – Northampton County: John Tatum is a witness to the will of John Sennor or Senor, Northampton County.  Entered 28 May 1709

Virginia County Records, Miscellaneous County Records, William Armstrong Crozier, page 221

1716 May 15 – Northampton County: This day the Court…bound out the child Rachel Wineston, aged two years of age, the 4 December last to John Tatum and Ann Tatum his daughter according to the law and the said Tatum pay cost.

Northampton County Record Book; Court Cases, Volume 15, 1710-1717, by Howard Mackey and Marlene A. Groves 2003.

1717 February 24 – Northampton County: John Tatum is a witness to the will of Cornelius Berry.  Entered 21 May 1717

 Virginia County Records, Miscellaneous County Records, William Armstrong Crozier, page 30.

1720 to 1724 Northampton County Tithable records John Tatam/Tatem/Tatom with only 1 tithe.   

Northampton County, Virginia Tithables – 1720-1769, by John B. Bell, 2008.

1725 Northampton Tithables:  John Tatom has 2 tithes, with his 2nd tithe being Phill Morgon.   1725 is his last tax record.

1725 March 4 – Northampton County: Will of John Tatum (abstract) – to daughter Ann Powell, children - John, David, Bowker, Thomas, and Winifred Tatum.  Wife Mary Tatum, Executrix.  Witnesses - Thomas Gossigon, Caesar Evans.  Entered 8 March 1725.

Virginia County Records, Miscellaneous County Records, William Armstrong Crozier 1997, page 69.  Problems with will abstract – not sure Tatum names include middle names which could make comma insertions incorrect.  Where did John (Junior), David and Bowker Tatum disappear to, as none appear in the 1720-1744 tax records?  Of special interest is John Tatum, Jr. whose birth date might be in the range of 1680-1690.

1727 Northampton County tithable: Mary Tatem with Tho. Cook.

 

Other Tatum/Tatoms etc. in Northampton Tithable Lists 1720 to 1769.

 

1720 to 1744 - Northampton County, Virginia Tithables:

1720, Thomas Tatom is with Richard Nottingham, Junior,

1721 to 1726 with Sarah Nottingham’s 2 tithes consist of Thomas Tatem/Tatom + Richard Nottingham (Notingham) Junior.   

1727, Thomas Tatom is grouped with Richard Notingham, Senior.

1731, Thomas Tatem is back with Sarah Nottingham.  

1734, Thomas Tatum is listed with 2 tithes, with 2nd one unnamed.  

1735, Thomas Tatom has 1 tithe.    There is no 1736 tithe record.

1737, Thomas Tatum is listed with Edward Tatum. 

~1737 Northampton County: Thomas Tatum is a witness to the will of John Mapp.

1738  Edward Tatum is next listed under John Morgan

1739 Edward Tatum with Gauton Young

1740 Edward Tatum with Thomas Gowdress, before disappearing.  

1738, 1739, Thomas Tatum is with Henry Spratling. 

Beginning in 1739, there appears to be second Thomas Tatom, one with 2 tithes. 

1740 through 1743, there are two Thomas Tatum/Tatoms; one with John Goffigon and the other with Henry Sprathlin or Henry Clegg. 

1744, there is only Thomas Tatom x 1.    

1745 to 1764 Northampton Tithables are lost; thereafter, only 1765, 1766 (incomplete), and 1769 survived. 

1765 (possibly a different line) - Northampton County Tithables: Berry Joynes has John Tatham, William Taylor and 2 slaves.  William Major Patt has Michael Tatham, James Bromar and 14 slaves.

1769, Michael Rickets Tatham, no acreage, with Anderson Parker, William Kendall, Nathaniel Wilkins.   Use of middle name, possibly due to another Michael Tatham in Accomack County.

1760’s through November 1775:  There is a John Tatham + Margaret living in this county as late as November 1775 requiring financial support from Hungar’s Parish Church. ***

Vestry Book of Hungar’s Parish, Northampton County, Virginia 1757-1875, by Dr. Howard Mackey and Candy Perry, 1997

 

2 – Thomas Tatum (died 1769 + will) of Currituck County, North Carolina

 

             Details are found at end of Mariner Tatems Chapter.  Of interest is the 1767/1769 will of Thomas Tatum.  1755 and 1758 Currituck County tax records spell his surname as Tatom, but otherwise he is spelled Tatum.  Currituck County, North Carolina has common boundaries with Norfolk County, Virginia.

 

3 - Samuel Tatom (died 1772) of York County, Virginia

 

1772 June 13 - York County, Virginia: Deed of Gift from Samuel Tatom of York, Hampton Parish, York County for love, goodwill and affection have given to my loving and dutiful wife & children in the same parish as follows, to my wife Mary Tatom, I do give to her and to whomsoever she shall think proper the goods & chattels now in my house namely 1 feather bed & furniture, 1 trunk, 2 flaged chairs, 1 spinning wheel, 1 iron pot, 1 stone pot, 1 frying pan, 1 mahogany tea chest.  I do give to my daughter Susanna Tatom 1 feather bed and Furniture, 1 large chest, 2 flaged chairs, 1 table, 1 pewter dish, 6 plates, 1 iron pot & 1 stone pot.  I do give to my daughter Margaret Tatom 1 feather bed & furniture, 1 large chest, 2 flaged chairs, 1 table, 1 pewter dish, 6 plates, 1 iron pot, 1 stone pot.  But in case it shall please God that either of my two daughters aforesaid shall die before they shall arrive & come to the age of 18 or marry then to the other that is living.  But in case they shall both depart this life before they arrive as aforesaid then to my wife & to whomsoever she shall think proper absolutely without any manner of conditions.  Witnesses: James Davis, Whitehead Lester.  Ackn. 15 June 1772 and recorded.  Attest: Thos Everard Clerk. (page 234). 

 

4 - Richard Tatom (1730 to 1790) of Bladen County, North Carolina

 

“Pvt. Richard Tatom,” born 1730, died August 1790 per grave stone at Tatum Graveyard, Bladen County, North Carolina. findagrave.com.   Who is he?

 

Jesse Tatum, born between 1763 and 1820 and died 1870.  Per Bladen County Historical Records: Jesse is interred in this same cemetery.  There is no marker for him, possibly one of the unknown markers.   According to DAR application papers, he was born ca1763-1820???   Findagrave.com indicates he was the son (grandson?) of Richard Tatum, Sr. 1732 to August 1790 and Mary Tatum.  Children of Jesse Tatum: Thoflyus Tatum (1804-1864).  findagrave.

 

(2). Which Tatoms are in early Granville County, North Carolina?

1755 Granville Tax and 1755 Granville County Militia Record: no Tatoms

“Abraham Tatum”/Tatom 1763

John Tatum Granville Tax 1769

Barnett Tatom, Granville Tax 1771

John Tatom, Granville Tax 1771

John Tatom, Granville Tax 1784

John Tatom, Jr. Granville Tax 1784

Barnard Tatom Granville Tax 1784

Samuel Tatom, Granville Tax 1784

 

1786 North Carolina State Census of Granville County (1st – w.m. 21-60; 2nd w.m under 21 and above 60, 3rd w.f. all ages.

Barnet Tatom 1-2-2, Fishing Creek District

William Tatom, 1-1-2, Dutch District

John Tatom, 1-1-1, Dutch District

1788 Granville County, North Carolina tax: (1) Barnard Tatom, Tabb’s Creek District, 135 acres; (2) William Tatom, Reed’s District, 140 acres; (3). John Tatum, Dutch District, 80 acres.

Colonial and State Records of North Carolina, Volume 5, page 1270.

1790 US Census of North Carolina, Granville County: Appears missing.

 

(3). Marriage Bonds of Granville County, North Carolina

 

Tatom, Barnet & Mary Thompson, 20 August 1778; Solomon Walker, bm, P. Henderson, wit

Tatom, John & Peggy Phillips, 13 January 1781: Fowler Jones, bm; Asa Searcy, wit

Tatom, John & Mary Write, 20 October 1783; James Cash, bm; Henry Potter, wit

Tatom, John Jr. & Martha Hicks, 1 August 1782; William Hicks, bm; Bennet Searcy, wit.

Tatum, Henry & Patty Bass, 12 November 1838; Littleton Mitchell, bm; J. M. Wiggins, Witness

Tatom, Stephen & Salley Owen, 27 December 1799; George Browning, bm; H. Dalley, William Tatom was born 11 January 1760 Spotsylvania County, Virginia Byars, wit.

Tatom, William & Margret Wright, 29 December 1781; Fowler Jones, bm; Bennet Searcy wit.

Jones, Fowler & Elisabeth Tatom, 17 November 1778; John Tatom, bm

Hunt, Presley & Mary Thweat, 21 August 1780; Abner Tatom, bm; John Searchy Jr., wit

Goodwin, Samuel and Keziah Tatom, 29 March 1773; Robt. Bell, bm; William Hardon, wit

Brame, Thomas & Elizabeth Roffe, 11 Feb. 1778; James Brame, bm, Abner Tatom, wit. 

 

Orange County, North Carolina Marriage bonds  

1799 December 24 – Orange County: Stephen Tatom to Salley Owen, William Tatom, bondsman

1822 August 20 – Orange County: Willie Tatom and Lively Weaver, Benjamin Hester, bondsman.

1827 May 7 – Orange County: George Tatom to Betsey Seaver, John Scott, bondsman

1827 September 2 – Orange County: George Tatum to Cynthia Mayhoe, John Clinton, bondsman

 

(4). Lincoln County, Georgia Tax

1805 – Lincoln County, Dooly District: Jane Tatom

1810 – Lincoln County: Jane Tatum 202 acres.

1810 – Lincoln County: Agent for the estate of Isaack Tatom, deceased, 140 acres, Soap Creek 

1810 – Lincoln County: Silas Tatom, no details

        An early settler of Troup County, Georgia

                   

Unplaced Tatums in Tennessee

 

1840 US Census of Fayette County, Tennessee: William Tatum 1 male and 1 female 5-10, 1 male and 1 female 10-15, 1 male and 1 female 15-20, 1 male 20-30, 1 male and female 40-50,    Richard Tatom is in this county at the same time.

 

1850 US Census of Fayette County, Tennessee: Ann Tatum 51 Georgia, Richard Tatum, farmer, 20 Tn, Solomon Tatum 18 Tn, Martha A. Tatum 15 Tn, Amanda J. Tatum 11 Tn.

 

Unplaced Stephen Tatoms

 

1820 Pike County, Mississippi: Steph. Tatum – 1 male 0-9, 1 female 10-16, 1 male and 1 female 16-25, 1 male and 1 female 26-45.  Name on census questionable.

 

1830 US Census of Range 3 & 4, Madison County, Alabama: Stephen Tatom 1 male 0-4, 1 male and 1 female 5-9, 1 male and 1 female 10-15, 1 female 15-20, 1 male and 1 female 40-50.   

 

 Abner Tatum (1806/07) + wife Mary

 

1830 US Census of Wayne County, Tennessee: Abner Tatum, 1 male and 1 female 20-30. (page 504, image 49/70 ancestry.com)

1850 US Census of Hickman County, Tennessee: Abner Tatum 43 Tn, Mary Tatum 43 Tn, all children born Tn; A_ (can’t read) 19n (f), Susannah Tatum 18, James Tatum 16, George Tatum 13, John Tatum 12, William Tatum 11, Margaret Tatum 9, Rachael Tatum 8, Nancy Tatum 6, Nancy Tatum 6, Boid Tatum 1/12. (image 167/181 ancestry.com)